https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Engineering-students-receive-prestigious-Graduate-Research-Fellowships-.aspx588Engineering students receive prestigious Graduate Research Fellowships <p>​Three seniors and a doctoral student in the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis have been chosen for the competitive National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. <br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/washu%20engineering%20commencement.JPG?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>The fellowship, the oldest of its kind, awards a three-year annual stipend of $34,000 as well as a $12,000 allowance for tuition and fees, opportunities for international research and professional development, and the freedom to conduct research at any accredited U.S. institution of graduate education. From more than 13,000 applications received for the 2017 competition, the NSF awarded 2,000 fellowships.</p><p>The new fellows are:</p><ul><li><p><strong>Savannah Est</strong>, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering with a minor in materials science & engineering;</p></li><li><p><strong>Roger Albert Iyengar</strong>, a senior majoring in computer science; </p></li><li><p><strong>Corban Swain</strong>, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering;</p></li><li><p><strong>Ian Berke</strong>, a first-year doctoral student in biomedical engineering. </p></li></ul><p>Three undergraduate Engineering students and two alumni received honorable mentions, which is considered a significant national academic achievement. They are: </p><ul><li><p><strong>Ananya Benegal</strong>, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering with a minor in mechanical engineering and a master's student in mechanical engineering;</p></li><li><p><strong>Arnold Tao</strong>, a senior majoring in biomedical engineering;</p></li><li><p><strong>Louis Shen Wang</strong>, a senior majoring in chemical engineering with a minor in chemistry;</p></li><li><p><strong>Timothy Bartholomew</strong>, who earned a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering in 2015 and is now a graduate student at Carnegie-Mellon University.</p></li><li><p><strong>Pratik Singh Sachdeva</strong>, who earned a bachelor's degree in applied science in 2015 and is now a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley.<br/></p></li></ul><p>The Graduate Research Fellowship has a history of selecting recipients who achieve high levels of success in their future academic and professional careers. Many become life-long leaders that contribute significantly to both scientific innovation and teaching. Past fellows include numerous Nobel Prize winners; U.S. Secretary of Energy Steven Chu; Google founder Sergey Brin; and Freakonomics co-author Steven Levitt. Since 1952, NSF has funded more than 50,000 Graduate Research Fellowships out of more than 500,000 applicants. <br/></p>Beth Miller 2017-03-20T05:00:00ZThree seniors and a doctoral student have been chosen for the competitive National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Student-launches-site-celebrating-immigrant-entrepreneurs.aspx568Student launches site celebrating immigrant entrepreneursStudies show that 40 percent of America’s Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or their children. In other words, by people like <a href="http://www.jordangonen.com/">Jordan Gonen</a>, son of an Israeli immigrant and a sophomore at Washington University in St. Louis.<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/celebrating%20immigrants.JPG?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>This week, Gonen and his friend Henry Kaufman, of Colorado, launched the site <a href="http://celebrateimmigrants.us/">CelebrateImmigrants.us</a>, an ever-growing list of immigrants who founded innovative American businesses, ranging from  Irish immigrant James Gamble of Procter & Gamble to South African-born Elon Musk of Tesla. The site is Gonen’s response to debate over recent changes to U.S immigration policy and has attracted visitors from 100 nations.</p><p>Here, Gonen, who is studying finance at Olin Business School and computer science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, shares why he created the site, how viewers have responded and what other projects are on his plate.</p><p> <strong><em>What was the genesis of the site?</em></strong></p><p>It was 11 o’clock at night on Saturday and I had just seen the movie “Founder,” which is about the founder of McDonald’s. I was thinking about the drive and determination it takes to start a business — qualities immigrants frequently possess. I was talking to Henry and we decided we should do this. We worked until 3 a.m. and launched. I don’t consider myself a politically involved person, but I don’t think of immigration as a political issue. This is more of a life debate.</p><p> <em><strong>You are the son of an immigrant. How has the experience shaped your views?</strong></em></p><p>My dad came to the United States with $2,000 stuffed in his socks and  worked hard to succeed. What I’ve learned through my dad’s culture and also from the tech world is that doing matters more than talking, whether that means launching a small side project like CelebrateImmigrants.us or starting a new company. It’s about going for it and testing your ideas. A lot of immigrants really embrace that concept. Many start with little to no resources in their new country. And they still manage to make things happen.</p><div style="float: left; margin: 0px 20px 20px 0px; width: 300px; font-style: italic; font-size: 0.9em; text-align: center;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/gonen.jpg" alt="Jordan Gonen"/><br/>Jordan Gonen </div><p> <strong><em>How did the list come together? </em></strong></p><p>We built this site solely on the premise of bringing more recognition to founders that we looked up to. We compiled the list manually and we know we left some people out. We added a “suggest a founder” button that should help with that. Everyone knows about Elon Musk, but there are so many amazing stories out there, from Ukrainian immigrant Igor Sikorsky, who founded Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and built the first helicopter, to Iranian-American Arash Ferdowsi, founder of DropBox. </p><p> <strong><em>You also are very entrepreneurial and innovative. What projects have you launched?</em></strong></p><p>In October, a friend and I launched  Disrupt Cards, a Silicon Valley version of “Cards Against Humanity” (sample cards: Angel investing in toddlers, the Satanic chanting of Jeff Bezos, Clippy). We were on CNN and got a lot of other cool press. It’s kind of offensive but also funny. Henry and I also launched another project last week called WritingClub, which provides a writing prompt every day (Sample prompts: “The biggest mountain you have to climb this year,” “The most important piece of technology.”)</p><p>And right now I’m working on a new company called Scaphold, which helps people build apps faster using GraphQL. I have a few more projects that will launch soon. One is called Book Club, which allows users to create and share lists of books. A lot of people wait until they have the perfect idea, but for me, it’s about just doing it.</p><p>​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage</h3><div> Student Life: <a href="http://www.studlife.com/news/2017/02/09/sophomore-creates-website-to-celebrate-achievements-of-immigrants-in-u-s/?utm_source=MadMimi&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Student+Life+Email+Edition+%282%2F9%2F2017%29%3A+Block+funding%3B+Arraignment%3B+Comedy+show&utm_campaign=20170209_m137500287_Student+Life+Email+Edition+%282%2F9%2F2017%29%3A+Block+funding%3B+Arraignment%3B+Comedy+show&utm_term=Sophomore+creates+website+to+celebrate+achievements+of+immigrants+in+U_S_">Sophomore creates website to celebrate achievements of immigrants in U.S.</a></div></div></span>Jordan Gonen launched CelebrateImmigrants.us in response to the executive order suspending immigration from seven nations.Diane Toroian Keaggy, source.wustl.eduhttps://source.wustl.edu/2017/02/amid-immigration-debate-olin-student-launches-site-celebratng-immigrant-entrepreneurs/2017-02-01T06:00:00ZJordan Gonen launched CelebrateImmigrants.us in response to the executive order suspending immigration from seven nations.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/GlobalHack.aspx565Students develop software to connect homeless agencies<p>​While it might seem counterintuitive to ask computer programmers from around the world to help solve the homelessness problem in St. Louis, that's exactly what a local organization did in October. </p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/GlobalHack_3078.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>GlobalHack holds 48-hour intensive software development sessions, called hackathons, twice a year to give computer programmers and developers the opportunity to create a product prototype toward an assigned challenge. The company has hosted six hackathons since its beginning in 2013, all of which have included students and alumni from the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, who have been successful in winning cash prizes and even getting jobs through the experience. </p><p>In the October event, <a href="https://globalhack.org/globalhack-vi/">GlobalHack VI</a>, a team of School of Engineering & Applied Science students and an alumnus took third place in the College division, which brought with it a $25,000 cash prize. Members of the winning team, called STLUnited, were Daniel Borstelmann, who earned a bachelor's degree in applied science (computer science) with a minor in architecture in 2016; Ben Bush, a junior majoring in computer science; Darius Calliet, a senior majoring in computer science, applied science and business administration; and Justin Guyton, a junior majoring in computer science with a minor in electrical engineering. All four are veterans of the GlobalHack competitions and have been on teams that have won previous competitions. Thirty-six other WashU students also participated in the event on other teams.</p><p>While STLUnited brought their skills and lessons learned from previous competitions into GlobalHack VI, the event had a different mission than earlier ones: each team was challenged to create software that would help the 60 St. Louis-area agencies, such as the St. Patrick Center, that provide services to the homeless to do so more seamlessly. </p><p>To ensure that this becomes a reality and not only a weekend project, GlobalHack is targeting 2018 for its next 1,000-person hackathon and will use $250,000 of the $1 million designated for GlobalHack VI to focus on making this software a reality. </p><blockquote>"We found that a lot of developers were in it for the social part, not for the money," said Delia Chassaing, recruitment and outreach coordinator for GlobalHack and a 2016 Washington University graduate with a bachelor's degree in economics and healthcare management and a minor in Italian. "We wanted to be building software that mattered globally and take a more hands-on approach." <p></p></blockquote><p>Bush said the team knew in advance that the challenge would involve homelessness. Once the team received the challenge at the event's beginning on Friday evening, they had a few hours to brainstorm. </p> <p></p> <p>"There are a lot of excellent services in St. Louis that provide different resources and aid to homeless citizens, but from our perspective, what they were missing was a centralized system to share resources and more effectively communicate about who they were helping," Bush said. "We are tech-minded people – we don't know how to solve homelessness in St. Louis, but we have the ability to develop tools that can help people who do know how to solve homelessness."</p><p>The team developed a web application that lists all shelters in the area and the availability of their resources, such as open beds, meals, or ability to take children. Their idea was that a homeless person could fill out an application with their basic information using the app, then two things would result: the person would receive an immediate recommendation on where to go for the resources they needed, and the person's information would appear in a centralized database the team built that goes to all social workers. </p><p>Calliet, who has participated in about a half-dozen hackathons keeps returning because he says he enjoys the environment. </p><p>"We have one purpose, and that one purpose is to build this idea," he said.</p><p>While hackathons involve dedicating 48 hours to one project — with little or no sleep — which may not appeal to everyone, Chassaing recommends that WashU students, no matter their major, learn the basics of computer programming. </p><p>"I think it's a powerful tool becoming more and more so every day," she said. "I would encourage every WashU student to take CS 131 (Introduction to Computer Science). It's a different mindset, and the combination of that mindset and the skills that can be acquired in an intro class are fantastic.</p><p>"There is going to be a large gap in the workforce in terms of how many people have coding skills, and how many of those jobs are being filled," Chassaing said. "More and more focus should be on teaching coding skills and igniting a passion for that mindset as early as possible."</p><p>Dedric Carter, vice chancellor for operations and technology transfer and professor of practice in Engineering, says hackathons have much to offer students.</p><p>"The interesting opportunity of a hackathon such as GlobalHack is for students to transcend the lab and classroom to address challenging, and often complex real-world problems," he says. "These experiences shape a hunger for learning and solidify the skills necessary for the next generation of engineers.  Engineers characterize, envision, solve, and build.  GlobalHack provides an opportunity to touch on all of these areas."</p><p>Borstelmann, who was on a team that won Global Hack 1 in 2014 and now works for TopOpps, said that event changed his life. </p><p>“If I had not gone to GlobalHack 1, I wouldn’t have gotten the job I have now,” he said. “Through hackathons, I had my eyes opened to this whole other side of entrepreneurship and web startups. What hackathons gave me was the ability to see a different side of the real world. They expanded my perspective and sent me down a track where I was able to leave college with a whole new set of skills gained through work in the real world.”</p><p> <br/> </p> <span> <hr/></span> <p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 21,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p><p>​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>WashU Engineers at GlobalHack </h3><div> <strong></strong></div><p></p><ul><li>Justin Guyton<br/></li><li>Ben Bush<br/></li><li>Daniel Borstelmann<br/></li><li>Darius Calliet<br/></li></ul><p></p><p></p></div></span>A team of Washington University School of Engineering & Applied Science students took third place in GlobalHack VI held in October. (From left) Justin Guyton, Ben Bush, Daniel Borstelmann, Darius Calliet, with Laurie Phillips, CEO of St. Patrick Center. Beth Miller2017-01-20T06:00:00ZA team of Washington University School of Engineering & Applied Science students took third place in GlobalHack VI.<p>​WashU engineers took third place in <a href="https://globalhack.org/globalhack-vi/">GlobalHack VI</a></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-programming-team-headed-to-world-competition-.aspx550WashU programming team headed to world competition <p>​Three Washington University in St. Louis undergraduate students will represent the university at the World Finals of the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Finals in South Dakota next May. </p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/ICPC_Regionals.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Patrick Chao, Sam Heil and Joey Woodson took second place in a regional programming competition in November against teams from Northwestern University, University of Illinois, University of Chicago, Vanderbilt University and other universities in the Midwest region. The team was one of four WashU teams at the competition in Springfield, Ill.</p><p>Dennis Cosgrove, a professor of the practice in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and faculty adviser to the teams, said this is the first year in many years that WashU has had a team qualify for the world competition, which will bring in teams from universities worldwide. </p><p>"There are some really great schools in this region, particularly in computer science," Cosgrove said. "While the faculty members expect WashU to do well, to crack the top three is an impressive feat. Joey, Sam and Patrick should be very proud of themselves." </p><p>The competition gives teams 10 programming problems to solve and only one computer on which to solve them. The team made up of Chao, Heil and Woodson completed seven problems, coming out on top with a team from Northwestern. The Northwestern team won the tie breaker based on total time. </p><p>"WashU not only had a team qualify for Worlds, but also demonstrated the best depth in the region with all of our teams performing well," Cosgrove said.</p><p>Among the other WashU teams, two completed five problems each, and one completed four.</p><p>Heil, a first-year student majoring in math and computer science, said for one of the problems, the team was given a set of incomplete instructions to get to the end goal. The challenge was to get to the end goal by making the smallest number of changes to the instructions. Heil said this problem took about three hours and about six attempts to get the program to work.</p><p>Woodson, who is earning bachelor's and master's degrees in computer science with a minor in economics, has been on the team for five years. He said the competitions provide him with the opportunity to show his programming and problem-solving skills among the community and have given him valuable practice for his interviews with Google, where he will be working after he graduates. </p><p>"Qualifying for the World Finals gives me the opportunity to represent my school in competition one last time before starting a full-time job," Woodson said. "It is an honor to represent WashU in its first trip to the World Finals in eight years, and I hope we can make our school proud with our performance there, just as we did at Regionals."</p><p>Chao, a senior majoring in physics and math, has been on a team each year while at WashU. </p><p>"It's a nice feeling when you have an idea and you see it crystallize and get an answer and see it come together in a relatively short time span that problem-solving allows," he says. "It's great to be able to end my college competitive programming career on a high note."<br/></p><span><hr/></span><p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 21,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p>Members of the four teams representing Washington University at the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest in Springfield, Ill., last month, with Dennis Cosgrove (front, far right).Beth Miller2016-12-07T06:00:00ZThree Washington University in St. Louis undergraduate students will represent the university at the World Finals of the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Finals in South Dakota next May.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Washington-University-invests-25-million-in-imaging-sciences.aspx542Washington University invests $25 million in imaging sciences<p>​​Building on its extensive history in imaging – from individual cells and nerves to cancerous tumors and Alzheimer's plaques – Washington University in St. Louis is launching a bold $25 million initiative over the next five years to support its researchers as they develop innovative technologies aimed at improving science and medicine worldwide. <br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/imaging_initiative.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Initially, the Imaging Sciences Initiative – a partnership between the School of Engineering & Applied Science and the School of Medicine – will bring in more than a dozen new faculty with strengths in various aspects of imaging sciences. Both schools have their own long-standing strengths in the field, with more than 100 imaging scientists between them. </p><p>The new initiative strengthens the connection between the schools and encourages the development of new imaging technologies to diagnose and treat disease as well as study intricate biological structures, metabolism and physiology, and critical molecular and cellular processes. </p><p>"This initiative allows us to attack challenges in imaging that can only be addressed by collaborations between medicine and engineering, including developing fundamental new technologies and advanced computational methods," said Aaron F. Bobick, dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science and the James M. McKelvey Professor. "Washington University will further establish its place at the forefront of groundbreaking biomedical engineering and imaging research that can have an immediate impact in the world."</p><p>Six departments in the two schools will join the initiative: the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science & Engineering, and Electrical & Systems Engineering, at the engineering school; and the Departments of Radiology, Radiation Oncology, and Cell Biology & Physiology, at the medical school. Additional faculty as part of the initiative are planned for subsequent years.</p><p>Beyond the faculty recruiting effort, the initiative includes plans for imaging research centers focused on fundamental science and technology, as well as translational clinical opportunities. In addition, an interdisciplinary doctoral program in imaging sciences will be established.</p><blockquote>"I am thrilled with the potential this initiative holds for pushing the boundaries of imaging technology to better diagnose and treat cancer, Alzheimer's and other diseases that so tragically affect society," said David H. Perlmutter, MD, executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of the School of Medicine. "Welcoming new scientists to our faculty and training the next generation of imaging scientists is exciting. I am eager to see the benefits this effort will have on mankind."</blockquote><p>​At the outset of the initiative, <a href="/departments-faculty/faculty/Pages/openings.aspx#isei">eight new faculty members will be hired for the 2017-18 academic year</a>: four in Engineering and four in Medicine, with two in the Department of Radiology and one each in the Departments of Radiation Oncology and Cell Biology & Physiology. <a href="/departments-faculty/faculty/Pages/openings.aspx#isei">Four more faculty are expected to be added in the 2018-19 academic year. </a></p><p>"There is a very strong history here in imaging, and we want to maintain and build on that tradition," said <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Steven-George.aspx">Steven C. George, MD, PhD</a>, the Elvera & William Stuckenberg Professor of Technology & Human Affairs and chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. "By bringing together the vast knowledge base between basic scientists in engineering and medicine, we have the potential to change medicine as we know it."</p><p>Joseph P. Culver, a professor of radiology, physics and biomedical engineering, agreed. "Imaging sciences is fundamentally an interdisciplinary science that is at the boundary between several fields. It continues to be an extremely rich area for innovation," Culver said. "In this initiative, we are seeking applicants who will develop new imaging methods targeted to the cutting edge of biomedical research."</p><p>Washington University is recognized as a world leader in imaging sciences, with much of its work concentrated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. University scientists, for example, are engaged in research to map the myriad connections and networks in the human brain as well as regions of brain function; develop hi-tech goggles that, when used with a special dye, illuminate cancer cells; and visualize drought-related structural damage to plants that can't be seen by the naked eye. </p><p>“We are excited to grow areas such as super-resolution microscopy, a kind of light microscopy of exceedingly tiny objects; correlative light and electron microscopy, which combine the advantages of light and electron microscopy to visualize cellular structures and processes in fine detail; and dynamic live cell imaging,” said David Piston, the Edward J. Mallinckrodt Jr. Professor and head of the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology. “To explore and develop these imaging methods, medical researchers need the help of engineers. This new initiative will allow us to grow and nurture such collaborations in ways that would not be possible by recruiting new faculty members through a single department.”<br/></p><blockquote>Washington University's history in imaging dates back more than 125 years, when physicians used X-rays in a spinal surgery at the School of Medicine. The university's first hospital was among the early leaders in adopting X-ray technology and teaching it to students. In the 1920s, Washington University researchers were the first to use X-rays to view the gallbladder.</blockquote><p> And as early as the 1930s, university researchers and physicians used imaging technologies to diagnose pulmonary and heart diseases. In the 1970s, research by Michel Ter-Pogossian at the university's Mallinckdrodt Institute of Radiology, led to the development of the PET scanner. PET scans now are used worldwide to detect disease and as a research tool. </p> <p>More recently, Washington University researchers led the development of optical probes for imaging of gene expression in cancer cells and protein-protein interactions. In 2008, Tim Holy, now professor of neuroscience, developed the Objective Coupled Planar Illumination microscope that enables rapid imaging of tens of thousands of neurons in 3-D. His work set a world record for the largest number of neurons imaged at a single time. </p><p>The pioneering work in radiation treatment planning by Jerome Cox Jr., senior professor in computer science & engineering, paved the way for systems still used today to reconstruct images from CT and PET scanners that aid in the diagnosis of cancers and cardiovascular disease. In addition, his Laboratory Instrument Computer (LINC), developed in collaboration with researchers from the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at the School of Medicine, transformed biomedical research by integrating computer science with medicine. </p><p> </p> <span> <hr/></span>  <p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,300 undergraduate students, more than 900 graduate students and more than 23,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p><p>Washington University School of Medicine is one of the leading medical research, teaching and patient-care institutions in the nation. Among U.S. medical schools, it is among the top five recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health and is ranked No. 6 by U.S. News & World Report. The school's faculty physicians make up the medical staffs at <a href="http://www.barnesjewish.org/">Barnes-Jewish</a> and <a href="http://www.stlouischildrens.org/">St. Louis Children's</a> hospitals. Through its affiliations with the hospitals, the School of Medicine is linked to <a href="http://www.bjc.org/">BJC HealthCare</a>.​</p><p>​​​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Imaging Sciences​ Research at WashU Engineering</h3><div><ul><li> <a href="/news/Pages/A-closer-look-inside.aspx" style="font-size: 1em; background-color: #ffffff;">Biomedical engineering professor to study new X-ray approach​​</a><br/></li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Renowned-imaging-engineer-to-join-Department-of-Biomedical-Engineering.aspx">Renowned imaging engineer to join Department of Biomedical Engineering​</a>​​</li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Earlier-Alzheimers-diagnosis-may-be-possible-with-new-imaging-compound.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff;">Earlier Alzheimer’s diagnosis may be possible with new imaging compound​</a>​ </li><li><a href="/departments-faculty/faculty/Pages/openings.aspx#isei">Faculty Openings </a><br/></li></ul></div></div></span> <p> <br/> </p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage</h3><div> St. Louis Business Journal: <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/news/2016/11/18/washington-university-to-invest-25-million-in.html">"Washington University to invest $25 million in imaging sciences"</a></div></div></span> <p> <br/> </p>Beth Miller and Tamara Bhandari2016-11-16T06:00:00ZIn a partnership between the School of Engineering & Applied Science and the School of Medicine, Washington University is launching a new initiative to support imaging sciences researchers in their development of new technologies.<div><p>Initiative will feature engineering, medicine collaborations<br/></p></div>

Notables

Newsletters