https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/NSF-awards-professor-299k-for-cloud-computing-research.aspx705NSF awards professor $299k for cloud computing research<p>​The National Science Foundation recently awarded a Washington University in St. Louis professor nearly $300,000 for continued research about cloud-based computing systems.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jain_Raj.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Raj-Jain.aspx">Raj Jain</a>, the Barbara J. & Jerome R. Cox, Jr. Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering & Applied Science, was awarded the three-year grant, which will allow his lab to zero in on how to keep cloud-based computing functioning at its best and more resilient. Jain's research will use artificial intelligence (AI) to find architectural faults in cloud systems, including slow downs in service.</p><p>Jain says the research will benefit a number of cloud applications, including telecommunications and real-time applications such as healthcare and smart grid systems.</p><p>"We're keeping track of what the latest trends and concerns are when it comes to the clouds," said Jain. "Using machine learning, we want to be able to determine if something is faulty right away, or predict when something is going to break down to prevent an outage."<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>Raj Jain2017-08-18T05:00:00ZProfessor Raj Jain was awarded the three-year grant, which will allow his lab to zero in on how to keep cloud-based computing functioning at its best and more resilient.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Crowley-earns-NSF-grant-for-collaborative-research.aspx701Crowley earns NSF grant for collaborative research<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Crowley_Patrick.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Patrick-Crowley.aspx">​Patrick Crowley</a>, professor of computer science and engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, received a three-year, $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for a collaborative research project on “SPLICE (secure predictive low-latency information centric edge) for next-generation wireless networks.” He is working with partners from Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Ohio State, Purdue and Texas A&M universities.<br/></p>Patrick Crowley2017-08-02T05:00:00ZPatrick Crowley is working with partners from Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Ohio State, Purdue and Texas A&M universities.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Testing-begins-for-student-created-app-to-aid-Alzheimers-diagnosis.aspx692Testing begins for student-created app to aid Alzheimer’s diagnosis<p>​In the hectic, tightly scheduled day at a memory clinic, doctors set aside blocks of time to meet with new patients suspected of having dementia. But much of that time is taken up gathering information needed to make a diagnosis, leaving little time for doctors to discuss the condition’s life-changing implications with patients and their families.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Memory-v2-760-600x400.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>​With the aim of streamlining the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, a student-led team has designed an online app to help doctors more quickly evaluate patients. The app is being tested at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.</p><p>“This app is not meant to replace the visit with the physician,” said MD/PhD student Robert Chen, who co-leads the student group known as Memento that designed the app. “It is meant to help physicians have more information about the patient before they are evaluated in person. With additional reliable and clinically relevant information in the hands of physicians beforehand, the hope is that physicians can make a diagnosis more quickly and confidently, and spend the extra time building a treatment plan and answering questions from patients and caregivers in the face of a devastating diagnosis.”</p><p>The app represents a collaboration between students at the Schools of Medicine, Arts & Sciences, and Engineering & Applied Science. It consists of 60 to 100 questions for a patient’s caregiver to answer on an iPad before the patient sees a dementia specialist. Once the questionnaire is complete, the app will generate a report with the information handily organized into categories that fit with the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR).</p><p>Developed at the School of Medicine, the CDR is the most commonly used tool for diagnosing dementia. It breaks down the patient’s symptoms into six domains – memory, orientation, judgment and problem solving, community affairs, home and hobbies, and personal care – and provides a score for each.</p><p>“Having all the intake information from the patient and family summarized in alignment with the CDR could be really helpful,” said <a href="https://neuro.wustl.edu/about-us/physician-faculty-directory/nupur-ghoshal-md-phd/">Nupur Ghoshal, MD, PhD</a>, an assistant professor of neurology and of psychiatry, and the faculty mentor on the project. “It wouldn’t make the diagnosis for us, but it could feed into the thought processes that we go through as we evaluate each patient.”</p><p>The students have launched a six-month trial of the new app at the School of Medicine’s <a href="http://memoryloss.wustl.edu/">Memory Diagnostic Center</a>. The caregiver of each new patient arriving for a dementia evaluation will be asked to use the app and answer the questions in the waiting room. Then, a doctor will examine the patient and make a diagnosis as usual.</p><p>Without seeing the patient, another doctor in the clinic will review the app’s report and make a diagnosis as well. With feedback from the physicians, the students will apply machine-learning techniques to identify which questions provided helpful information that led to an accurate diagnosis.</p><blockquote> “We will determine which questions were most indicative, which were the least indicative and, at any given point, what’s the next best question to ask,” said Allen Osgood, who co-leads the Memento team and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science from the School of Engineering & Applied Science in May.</blockquote> <p>The doctors also will note how long it takes them to read and digest the report, so the students can estimate how much time the app saves.</p><p>Building the app required not just an understanding of how Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed and treated, but programming and design, as well.</p><p>“One of the students, Jenny Liu, really helped make the app appealing and intuitive,” Ghoshal said. “It doesn’t look like your standard questionnaire. We hope that a warmer design will help caregivers feel more comfortable answering these questions.”</p><blockquote>The student group was brought together by <a href="http://slinghealth.org/">Sling Health Network</a>, a student-run biotechnology incubator that provides resources, training and mentorship to teams of students tackling clinical problems by developing innovative solutions. </blockquote><p>Along with Chen and Osgood, the team includes: Jenny Liu, who earned a bachelor’s degree in biology in 2016; Morgan Redding, who earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science with a second major in mathematics in May; and Stolovitz, who earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science with minors in design and physics, also in May.</p><p>If the trial is successful, the team plans to work with the Alzheimer’s Association to launch the app at other St. Louis-area neurology clinics in the future. Last summer, <a href="/news/pages/student-team-wins-10000-for-alzheimers-disease-diagnostic-tool.aspx">the team won $10,000</a> as a finalist for the Student Technology Prize for Primary Healthcare from the Gelfand Family Charitable Trust.</p><p>“Having the chance to build things from the ground up in an environment where there is no clear answer is definitely a testament to the education we’ve received at Washington University,” Osgood said. “Having the ability to go in and work with professionals to learn HIPAA compliance and systems security and all the different things we need to implement this on the user and technical side has been instrumental to the success of the project.”<br/></p><div class="boilerplate" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #3c3d3d; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 19.2px;"><h5 style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #2f3030;">Memento is supported by Sling Health, formerly Idea Labs, which has paid for two interns; the James M. McKelvey Undergraduate Research Scholar program; and the Alzheimer’s Association of St. Louis.</h5></div><div class="bio-wrapper" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #3c3d3d; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 19.2px;"> <strong style="box-sizing: inherit;"><a href="https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/testing-begins-student-created-app-aid-alzheimers-diagnosis/" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #a51417;">Originally published by the School of Medicine</a></strong></div><p> <br/> </p> <SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>​​​​​<div><br/></div><div><br/> <div>​​<br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Entrepr​​eneurship at WashU</h3><ul><li> <a href="/our-school/initiatives/Pages/entrepreneurship.aspx">WashU engineers </a>are engaged in St. Louis' startup community and contribute to more than 20 accelerators and incubators.</li><li> <a href="http://fuse.wustl.edu/">WashU Fuse</a> - igniting innovation and connecting entrepreneurs​<br/></li></ul></div>​​​</div><br/></div>To streamline diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease, a student-led team has designed an online app to help doctors more quickly evaluate patients. (Image: Robert Chen) Tamara Bhandari and Beth Millerhttps://source.wustl.edu/2017/07/testing-begins-student-created-app-aid-alzheimers-diagnosis/2017-07-31T05:00:00ZWith the aim of streamlining the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, a Washington University student-led team has designed an online app to help doctors more quickly evaluate patients. The app is being tested at the School of Medicine.<p>​By speeding detection, app aims to free doctors to discuss treatment, implications with patients<br/></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Alumni-spotlight-Jin-Sheen-Yeoh.aspx690Alumni spotlight: Jin Sheen Yeoh, BS '05<p>​Washington University made a lasting impact on Jin Sheen Yeoh, BS '05. It's not just the fond memories of her time on campus with her classmates but also the unparalleled experiences in the classroom that resonate with her and inspire her to give back to her alma mater. Yeoh has been WashU Loyal since graduating from the School of Engineering & Applied Science in 2005, and she recently shared how WashU continues to play an important role in her life.<br/></p><img alt="Jin Sheen Yeoh" src="/news/PublishingImages/Jin%20Sheen%20Yeoh.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><h3>First, would you mind briefly sharing a bit about what you have been up to since graduating from Washington University?</h3><p>I currently work for a pricing and profitability management software company, Vendavo, as a pricing consultant. I manage the design and delivery of customer-specific implementations. All in all, I've logged about 10 years of travel as a consultant nationally in the U.S. and also internationally in Asia and Europe. On a personal level, I'm heavily involved at church in the leadership team, providing organizational and operational support as well as being a part of the Worship team. I love to sing and play cajon.</p><h3>What inspired you to make your first gift to Washington University?</h3><p>It was the right thing to do. I was a recipient of the I.E. & Goldie G. Millstone Engineering scholarship, and I remember seeing two tables full of students that received scholarships and how generous [Millstone] was. But more importantly, in my situation, without that scholarship—I wouldn't be getting the education I did or the wherewithal to get to where I am professionally and personally. When I graduated and got my first job, I put in an amount each year for WashU in hopes of achieving the same thing for current and future students.</p><h3>Why do you think it is important for alumni to give to Washington University year after year?</h3><p>It's like growing a plant. If you want it to thrive into a tree and flourish, you have to water it, nourish it, and take care of it. It's not a sprint, it's a marathon. And WashU is a great marathon runner.</p><h3>Looking back on your time at WashU, what is one of your favorite memories?</h3><p>All-nighters at Sever Hall computer labs trying to finish up CS projects and homework. We were up all night during finals week last semester senior year, and we climbed out to the roof top to watch the sun rise over the downtown skyline. It was too cloudy and we didn't see much—but we realized how far we've come at WashU, and those friendships we've forged, many of which are still thriving and growing even now.</p><h3>Are you involved/connected with Washington University in other ways? If so, how?</h3><p>Yes, through the Engineering Eliot Society (committee member), Women & Engineering (committee member), and the Engineering LEAD Initiative (committee member). I'm also trying to help the WU Racing team get more traction in getting their time spent with WU Racing to be a "creditable" class/senior thesis project.</p><h3>What is your favorite spot on campus or in St. Louis?</h3><p><em>On Campus:</em> In the quad under the trees during late spring/early fall; Holmes Lounge during winter; Olin Library 2nd/3rd floor during the summer.</p><p><em>St. Louis:</em> Cathedral Basilica of St. Louis, Castlewood State Park—Lone Wolf Trail.<br/></p>Jin Sheen Yeohalumni.wustl.eduhttps://alumni.wustl.edu/getinvolved/loyaltysociety/AlumniSpotlight/Pages/Jin-Sheen-Yeoh.aspx2017-07-26T05:00:00Z"It's like growing a plant. If you want it to thrive into a tree and flourish, you have to water it, nourish it, and take care of it. It's not a sprint, it's a marathon. And WashU is a great marathon runner."
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Artificial-Intelligence-Genomics-Hackathon-Champions-include-WashU-engineer.aspx689AI Genomics Hackathon champions include WashU engineer<p>Brett Teng Gao, a senior Engineering student at Washington University in St. Louis, is making the most of his summer in the San Francisco Bay area. In addition to an internship with Roche Diagnostics, Gao spent a weekend at the Google-sponsored Artificial Intelligence (AI) Genomics Hackathon — the first of its kind— and his team won. It also was Gao's first hackathon.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Teng%20Gao%20(2).jpeg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>Gao, who is majoring in computer science and biology with a minor in mathematics, was one of four members of the team, which also included a cancer researcher and two computer scientists. Their prize was a Titan X Pascal GPU — a very high-powered graphical computer processor designed to run virtual reality and complex algorithms quickly. </p><p>The <a href="https://sv.ai/hackathon/">AI Genomics Hackathon</a>, held June 23-25 at Google Launchpad in San Francisco, brought together about 150 participants who organized into 40 teams. All came together to use AI, computations and biology to advance the understanding of neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), a rare disease that causes noncancerous tumors in the nervous system. </p><p>Gao said only about 20 percent of the hackathon's participants were undergraduate students, but the interdisciplinary collaboration he has learned at WashU was an asset to the team. </p><p>"This hackathon is really contributing to an ongoing patient cause for a rare disease," Gao said.</p><blockquote>"Computer scientists and biologists are from two different worlds, and it's so rare to get them together. It is amazing how this event brought both sides together to solve a problem."<br/></blockquote> <p>Hackathon participants had a unique set of materials to use in their quest. The hackathon's organizer, Onno Faber, an entrepreneur in the Bay Area, was diagnosed with NF2 and made the genome sequencing data from his tumor available to the participants. </p><p>Gao said that data was valuable because there is not enough data available on NF2, making it difficult to study, but the team combined its interdisciplinary skills to find the winning solution. </p><p>"Our approach to address this problem is to use a machine learning technique called transferred learning," Gao said. "We found a similar dataset for a sister disease that's far more common. We trained the machine learning algorithm using a bigger data set first, then we applied the algorithm on the rarer disease that we are tackling. Hopefully this will be useful for others studying the disease." <br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p><p>​<br/></p><span><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Silicon Valley Artificial Intelligence<br/></h3><div rtenodeid="2"><ul><li><a href="https://photos.google.com/share/AF1QipOS8fdnciaHy9mopMHm4ZcBKn6JfvxcjdpY1mLeEPf1XzUZ7AbqDZ5UOmoshuGC5w?key=eGlQMjc2TWRsMWd6RmxaVW01N3ZwUGZJb0d2UjZn">Hackathon Photos</a><br/></li><li><span style="font-size: 1em;"><a href="https://github.com/svai">Research Projects</a></span><br/></li><li><a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCprL6ZFEiJC7vWGpRUqdJqw">Hackathon Videos</a><br/></li></ul></div></div></span>Ben Hsu, Nandita Damaraju, Jo Varshney and Teng Gao (Photo courtesy of Jo Varshney)Beth Miller 2017-07-25T05:00:00Z"Computer scientists and biologists are from two different worlds, and it's so rare to get them together. It is amazing how this event brought both sides together to solve a problem."

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