https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Student-launches-site-celebrating-immigrant-entrepreneurs.aspx568Student launches site celebrating immigrant entrepreneursStudies show that 40 percent of America’s Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or their children. In other words, by people like <a href="http://www.jordangonen.com/">Jordan Gonen</a>, son of an Israeli immigrant and a sophomore at Washington University in St. Louis.<img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/celebrating%20immigrants.JPG?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>This week, Gonen and his friend Henry Kaufman, of Colorado, launched the site <a href="http://celebrateimmigrants.us/">CelebrateImmigrants.us</a>, an ever-growing list of immigrants who founded innovative American businesses, ranging from  Irish immigrant James Gamble of Procter & Gamble to South African-born Elon Musk of Tesla. The site is Gonen’s response to debate over recent changes to U.S immigration policy and has attracted visitors from 100 nations.</p><p>Here, Gonen, who is studying finance at Olin Business School and computer science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, shares why he created the site, how viewers have responded and what other projects are on his plate.</p><p> <strong><em>What was the genesis of the site?</em></strong></p><p>It was 11 o’clock at night on Saturday and I had just seen the movie “Founder,” which is about the founder of McDonald’s. I was thinking about the drive and determination it takes to start a business — qualities immigrants frequently possess. I was talking to Henry and we decided we should do this. We worked until 3 a.m. and launched. I don’t consider myself a politically involved person, but I don’t think of immigration as a political issue. This is more of a life debate.</p><p> <em><strong>You are the son of an immigrant. How has the experience shaped your views?</strong></em></p><p>My dad came to the United States with $2,000 stuffed in his socks and  worked hard to succeed. What I’ve learned through my dad’s culture and also from the tech world is that doing matters more than talking, whether that means launching a small side project like CelebrateImmigrants.us or starting a new company. It’s about going for it and testing your ideas. A lot of immigrants really embrace that concept. Many start with little to no resources in their new country. And they still manage to make things happen.</p><div style="float: left; margin: 0px 20px 20px 0px; width: 300px; font-style: italic; font-size: 0.9em; text-align: center;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/gonen.jpg" alt="Jordan Gonen"/><br/>Jordan Gonen </div><p> <strong><em>How did the list come together? </em></strong></p><p>We built this site solely on the premise of bringing more recognition to founders that we looked up to. We compiled the list manually and we know we left some people out. We added a “suggest a founder” button that should help with that. Everyone knows about Elon Musk, but there are so many amazing stories out there, from Ukrainian immigrant Igor Sikorsky, who founded Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation and built the first helicopter, to Iranian-American Arash Ferdowsi, founder of DropBox. </p><p> <strong><em>You also are very entrepreneurial and innovative. What projects have you launched?</em></strong></p><p>In October, a friend and I launched  Disrupt Cards, a Silicon Valley version of “Cards Against Humanity” (sample cards: Angel investing in toddlers, the Satanic chanting of Jeff Bezos, Clippy). We were on CNN and got a lot of other cool press. It’s kind of offensive but also funny. Henry and I also launched another project last week called WritingClub, which provides a writing prompt every day (Sample prompts: “The biggest mountain you have to climb this year,” “The most important piece of technology.”)</p><p>And right now I’m working on a new company called Scaphold, which helps people build apps faster using GraphQL. I have a few more projects that will launch soon. One is called Book Club, which allows users to create and share lists of books. A lot of people wait until they have the perfect idea, but for me, it’s about just doing it.</p><p>​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage</h3><div> Student Life: <a href="http://www.studlife.com/news/2017/02/09/sophomore-creates-website-to-celebrate-achievements-of-immigrants-in-u-s/?utm_source=MadMimi&utm_medium=email&utm_content=Student+Life+Email+Edition+%282%2F9%2F2017%29%3A+Block+funding%3B+Arraignment%3B+Comedy+show&utm_campaign=20170209_m137500287_Student+Life+Email+Edition+%282%2F9%2F2017%29%3A+Block+funding%3B+Arraignment%3B+Comedy+show&utm_term=Sophomore+creates+website+to+celebrate+achievements+of+immigrants+in+U_S_">Sophomore creates website to celebrate achievements of immigrants in U.S.</a></div></div></span>Jordan Gonen launched CelebrateImmigrants.us in response to the executive order suspending immigration from seven nations.Diane Toroian Keaggy, source.wustl.eduhttps://source.wustl.edu/2017/02/amid-immigration-debate-olin-student-launches-site-celebratng-immigrant-entrepreneurs/2017-02-01T06:00:00ZJordan Gonen launched CelebrateImmigrants.us in response to the executive order suspending immigration from seven nations.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/GlobalHack.aspx565Students develop software to connect homeless agencies<p>​While it might seem counterintuitive to ask computer programmers from around the world to help solve the homelessness problem in St. Louis, that's exactly what a local organization did in October. </p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/GlobalHack_3078.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>GlobalHack holds 48-hour intensive software development sessions, called hackathons, twice a year to give computer programmers and developers the opportunity to create a product prototype toward an assigned challenge. The company has hosted six hackathons since its beginning in 2013, all of which have included students and alumni from the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis, who have been successful in winning cash prizes and even getting jobs through the experience. </p><p>In the October event, <a href="https://globalhack.org/globalhack-vi/">GlobalHack VI</a>, a team of School of Engineering & Applied Science students and an alumnus took third place in the College division, which brought with it a $25,000 cash prize. Members of the winning team, called STLUnited, were Daniel Borstelmann, who earned a bachelor's degree in applied science (computer science) with a minor in architecture in 2016; Ben Bush, a junior majoring in computer science; Darius Calliet, a senior majoring in computer science, applied science and business administration; and Justin Guyton, a junior majoring in computer science with a minor in electrical engineering. All four are veterans of the GlobalHack competitions and have been on teams that have won previous competitions. Thirty-six other WashU students also participated in the event on other teams.</p><p>While STLUnited brought their skills and lessons learned from previous competitions into GlobalHack VI, the event had a different mission than earlier ones: each team was challenged to create software that would help the 60 St. Louis-area agencies, such as the St. Patrick Center, that provide services to the homeless to do so more seamlessly. </p><p>To ensure that this becomes a reality and not only a weekend project, GlobalHack is targeting 2018 for its next 1,000-person hackathon and will use $250,000 of the $1 million designated for GlobalHack VI to focus on making this software a reality. </p><blockquote>"We found that a lot of developers were in it for the social part, not for the money," said Delia Chassaing, recruitment and outreach coordinator for GlobalHack and a 2016 Washington University graduate with a bachelor's degree in economics and healthcare management and a minor in Italian. "We wanted to be building software that mattered globally and take a more hands-on approach." <p></p></blockquote><p>Bush said the team knew in advance that the challenge would involve homelessness. Once the team received the challenge at the event's beginning on Friday evening, they had a few hours to brainstorm. </p> <p></p> <p>"There are a lot of excellent services in St. Louis that provide different resources and aid to homeless citizens, but from our perspective, what they were missing was a centralized system to share resources and more effectively communicate about who they were helping," Bush said. "We are tech-minded people – we don't know how to solve homelessness in St. Louis, but we have the ability to develop tools that can help people who do know how to solve homelessness."</p><p>The team developed a web application that lists all shelters in the area and the availability of their resources, such as open beds, meals, or ability to take children. Their idea was that a homeless person could fill out an application with their basic information using the app, then two things would result: the person would receive an immediate recommendation on where to go for the resources they needed, and the person's information would appear in a centralized database the team built that goes to all social workers. </p><p>Calliet, who has participated in about a half-dozen hackathons keeps returning because he says he enjoys the environment. </p><p>"We have one purpose, and that one purpose is to build this idea," he said.</p><p>While hackathons involve dedicating 48 hours to one project — with little or no sleep — which may not appeal to everyone, Chassaing recommends that WashU students, no matter their major, learn the basics of computer programming. </p><p>"I think it's a powerful tool becoming more and more so every day," she said. "I would encourage every WashU student to take CS 131 (Introduction to Computer Science). It's a different mindset, and the combination of that mindset and the skills that can be acquired in an intro class are fantastic.</p><p>"There is going to be a large gap in the workforce in terms of how many people have coding skills, and how many of those jobs are being filled," Chassaing said. "More and more focus should be on teaching coding skills and igniting a passion for that mindset as early as possible."</p><p>Dedric Carter, vice chancellor for operations and technology transfer and professor of practice in Engineering, says hackathons have much to offer students.</p><p>"The interesting opportunity of a hackathon such as GlobalHack is for students to transcend the lab and classroom to address challenging, and often complex real-world problems," he says. "These experiences shape a hunger for learning and solidify the skills necessary for the next generation of engineers.  Engineers characterize, envision, solve, and build.  GlobalHack provides an opportunity to touch on all of these areas."</p><p>Borstelmann, who was on a team that won Global Hack 1 in 2014 and now works for TopOpps, said that event changed his life. </p><p>“If I had not gone to GlobalHack 1, I wouldn’t have gotten the job I have now,” he said. “Through hackathons, I had my eyes opened to this whole other side of entrepreneurship and web startups. What hackathons gave me was the ability to see a different side of the real world. They expanded my perspective and sent me down a track where I was able to leave college with a whole new set of skills gained through work in the real world.”</p><p> <br/> </p> <span> <hr/></span> <p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 21,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p><p>​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>WashU Engineers at GlobalHack </h3><div> <strong></strong></div><p></p><ul><li>Justin Guyton<br/></li><li>Ben Bush<br/></li><li>Daniel Borstelmann<br/></li><li>Darius Calliet<br/></li></ul><p></p><p></p></div></span>A team of Washington University School of Engineering & Applied Science students took third place in GlobalHack VI held in October. (From left) Justin Guyton, Ben Bush, Daniel Borstelmann, Darius Calliet, with Laurie Phillips, CEO of St. Patrick Center. Beth Miller2017-01-20T06:00:00ZA team of Washington University School of Engineering & Applied Science students took third place in GlobalHack VI.<p>​WashU engineers took third place in <a href="https://globalhack.org/globalhack-vi/">GlobalHack VI</a></p>
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-programming-team-headed-to-world-competition-.aspx550WashU programming team headed to world competition <p>​Three Washington University in St. Louis undergraduate students will represent the university at the World Finals of the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Finals in South Dakota next May. </p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/ICPC_Regionals.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Patrick Chao, Sam Heil and Joey Woodson took second place in a regional programming competition in November against teams from Northwestern University, University of Illinois, University of Chicago, Vanderbilt University and other universities in the Midwest region. The team was one of four WashU teams at the competition in Springfield, Ill.</p><p>Dennis Cosgrove, a professor of the practice in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and faculty adviser to the teams, said this is the first year in many years that WashU has had a team qualify for the world competition, which will bring in teams from universities worldwide. </p><p>"There are some really great schools in this region, particularly in computer science," Cosgrove said. "While the faculty members expect WashU to do well, to crack the top three is an impressive feat. Joey, Sam and Patrick should be very proud of themselves." </p><p>The competition gives teams 10 programming problems to solve and only one computer on which to solve them. The team made up of Chao, Heil and Woodson completed seven problems, coming out on top with a team from Northwestern. The Northwestern team won the tie breaker based on total time. </p><p>"WashU not only had a team qualify for Worlds, but also demonstrated the best depth in the region with all of our teams performing well," Cosgrove said.</p><p>Among the other WashU teams, two completed five problems each, and one completed four.</p><p>Heil, a first-year student majoring in math and computer science, said for one of the problems, the team was given a set of incomplete instructions to get to the end goal. The challenge was to get to the end goal by making the smallest number of changes to the instructions. Heil said this problem took about three hours and about six attempts to get the program to work.</p><p>Woodson, who is earning bachelor's and master's degrees in computer science with a minor in economics, has been on the team for five years. He said the competitions provide him with the opportunity to show his programming and problem-solving skills among the community and have given him valuable practice for his interviews with Google, where he will be working after he graduates. </p><p>"Qualifying for the World Finals gives me the opportunity to represent my school in competition one last time before starting a full-time job," Woodson said. "It is an honor to represent WashU in its first trip to the World Finals in eight years, and I hope we can make our school proud with our performance there, just as we did at Regionals."</p><p>Chao, a senior majoring in physics and math, has been on a team each year while at WashU. </p><p>"It's a nice feeling when you have an idea and you see it crystallize and get an answer and see it come together in a relatively short time span that problem-solving allows," he says. "It's great to be able to end my college competitive programming career on a high note."<br/></p><span><hr/></span><p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 21,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p>Members of the four teams representing Washington University at the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest in Springfield, Ill., last month, with Dennis Cosgrove (front, far right).Beth Miller2016-12-07T06:00:00ZThree Washington University in St. Louis undergraduate students will represent the university at the World Finals of the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Finals in South Dakota next May.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Washington-University-invests-25-million-in-imaging-sciences.aspx542Washington University invests $25 million in imaging sciences<p>​Initiative will feature engineering, medicine collaborations</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/imaging_initiative.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​​Building on its extensive history in imaging – from individual cells and nerves to cancerous tumors and Alzheimer's plaques – Washington University in St. Louis is launching a bold $25 million initiative over the next five years to support its researchers as they develop innovative technologies aimed at improving science and medicine worldwide. </p><p>Initially, the Imaging Sciences Initiative – a partnership between the School of Engineering & Applied Science and the School of Medicine – will bring in more than a dozen new faculty with strengths in various aspects of imaging sciences. Both schools have their own long-standing strengths in the field, with more than 100 imaging scientists between them. </p><p>The new initiative strengthens the connection between the schools and encourages the development of new imaging technologies to diagnose and treat disease as well as study intricate biological structures, metabolism and physiology, and critical molecular and cellular processes. </p><p>"This initiative allows us to attack challenges in imaging that can only be addressed by collaborations between medicine and engineering, including developing fundamental new technologies and advanced computational methods," said Aaron F. Bobick, dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science and the James M. McKelvey Professor. "Washington University will further establish its place at the forefront of groundbreaking biomedical engineering and imaging research that can have an immediate impact in the world."</p><p>Six departments in the two schools will join the initiative: the Departments of Biomedical Engineering, Computer Science & Engineering, and Electrical & Systems Engineering, at the engineering school; and the Departments of Radiology, Radiation Oncology, and Cell Biology & Physiology, at the medical school. Additional faculty as part of the initiative are planned for subsequent years.</p><p>Beyond the faculty recruiting effort, the initiative includes plans for imaging research centers focused on fundamental science and technology, as well as translational clinical opportunities. In addition, an interdisciplinary doctoral program in imaging sciences will be established.</p><blockquote>"I am thrilled with the potential this initiative holds for pushing the boundaries of imaging technology to better diagnose and treat cancer, Alzheimer's and other diseases that so tragically affect society," said David H. Perlmutter, MD, executive vice chancellor for medical affairs and dean of the School of Medicine. "Welcoming new scientists to our faculty and training the next generation of imaging scientists is exciting. I am eager to see the benefits this effort will have on mankind."</blockquote><p>​At the outset of the initiative, <a href="/departments-faculty/faculty/Pages/openings.aspx#isei">eight new faculty members will be hired for the 2017-18 academic year</a>: four in Engineering and four in Medicine, with two in the Department of Radiology and one each in the Departments of Radiation Oncology and Cell Biology & Physiology. <a href="/departments-faculty/faculty/Pages/openings.aspx#isei">Four more faculty are expected to be added in the 2018-19 academic year. </a></p><p>"There is a very strong history here in imaging, and we want to maintain and build on that tradition," said <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Steven-George.aspx">Steven C. George, MD, PhD</a>, the Elvera & William Stuckenberg Professor of Technology & Human Affairs and chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering. "By bringing together the vast knowledge base between basic scientists in engineering and medicine, we have the potential to change medicine as we know it."</p><p>Joseph P. Culver, a professor of radiology, physics and biomedical engineering, agreed. "Imaging sciences is fundamentally an interdisciplinary science that is at the boundary between several fields. It continues to be an extremely rich area for innovation," Culver said. "In this initiative, we are seeking applicants who will develop new imaging methods targeted to the cutting edge of biomedical research."</p><p>Washington University is recognized as a world leader in imaging sciences, with much of its work concentrated at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology. University scientists, for example, are engaged in research to map the myriad connections and networks in the human brain as well as regions of brain function; develop hi-tech goggles that, when used with a special dye, illuminate cancer cells; and visualize drought-related structural damage to plants that can't be seen by the naked eye. </p><p>“We are excited to grow areas such as super-resolution microscopy, a kind of light microscopy of exceedingly tiny objects; correlative light and electron microscopy, which combine the advantages of light and electron microscopy to visualize cellular structures and processes in fine detail; and dynamic live cell imaging,” said David Piston, the Edward J. Mallinckrodt Jr. Professor and head of the Department of Cell Biology and Physiology. “To explore and develop these imaging methods, medical researchers need the help of engineers. This new initiative will allow us to grow and nurture such collaborations in ways that would not be possible by recruiting new faculty members through a single department.”<br/></p><blockquote>Washington University's history in imaging dates back more than 125 years, when physicians used X-rays in a spinal surgery at the School of Medicine. The university's first hospital was among the early leaders in adopting X-ray technology and teaching it to students. In the 1920s, Washington University researchers were the first to use X-rays to view the gallbladder.</blockquote><p> And as early as the 1930s, university researchers and physicians used imaging technologies to diagnose pulmonary and heart diseases. In the 1970s, research by Michel Ter-Pogossian at the university's Mallinckdrodt Institute of Radiology, led to the development of the PET scanner. PET scans now are used worldwide to detect disease and as a research tool. </p> <p>More recently, Washington University researchers led the development of optical probes for imaging of gene expression in cancer cells and protein-protein interactions. In 2008, Tim Holy, now professor of neuroscience, developed the Objective Coupled Planar Illumination microscope that enables rapid imaging of tens of thousands of neurons in 3-D. His work set a world record for the largest number of neurons imaged at a single time. </p><p>The pioneering work in radiation treatment planning by Jerome Cox Jr., senior professor in computer science & engineering, paved the way for systems still used today to reconstruct images from CT and PET scanners that aid in the diagnosis of cancers and cardiovascular disease. In addition, his Laboratory Instrument Computer (LINC), developed in collaboration with researchers from the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at the School of Medicine, transformed biomedical research by integrating computer science with medicine. </p><p> </p> <span> <hr/></span>  <p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,300 undergraduate students, more than 900 graduate students and more than 23,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p><p>Washington University School of Medicine is one of the leading medical research, teaching and patient-care institutions in the nation. Among U.S. medical schools, it is among the top five recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health and is ranked No. 6 by U.S. News & World Report. The school's faculty physicians make up the medical staffs at <a href="http://www.barnesjewish.org/">Barnes-Jewish</a> and <a href="http://www.stlouischildrens.org/">St. Louis Children's</a> hospitals. Through its affiliations with the hospitals, the School of Medicine is linked to <a href="http://www.bjc.org/">BJC HealthCare</a>.​</p><p>​​​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Imaging Sciences​ Research at WashU Engineering</h3><div><ul><li> <a href="/news/Pages/A-closer-look-inside.aspx" style="font-size: 1em; background-color: #ffffff;">Biomedical engineering professor to study new X-ray approach​​</a><br/></li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Renowned-imaging-engineer-to-join-Department-of-Biomedical-Engineering.aspx">Renowned imaging engineer to join Department of Biomedical Engineering​</a>​​</li><li> <a href="/news/Pages/Earlier-Alzheimers-diagnosis-may-be-possible-with-new-imaging-compound.aspx" style="background-color: #ffffff;">Earlier Alzheimer’s diagnosis may be possible with new imaging compound​</a>​ </li><li><a href="/departments-faculty/faculty/Pages/openings.aspx#isei">Faculty Openings </a><br/></li></ul></div></div></span> <p> <br/> </p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage</h3><div> St. Louis Business Journal: <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/news/2016/11/18/washington-university-to-invest-25-million-in.html">"Washington University to invest $25 million in imaging sciences"</a></div></div></span> <p> <br/> </p>Beth Miller and Tamara Bhandari2016-11-16T06:00:00ZIn a partnership between the School of Engineering & Applied Science and the School of Medicine, Washington University is launching a new initiative to support imaging sciences researchers in their development of new technologies.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Bear-Studios-seeks-Engineering-students-to-join-its-team.aspx536Bear Studios seeks Engineering students to join its team<p>​Group offers consulting, web development</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/BearStudios_Peter_Avi.jpeg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />​​​​​Do you have a great idea for a business but don't know where to start? Bear Studios, a group run completely by undergraduate students, is available to help other students and others in the Washington University community get their business off the ground.<br/>​​ <p>And now that the group has grown, it is looking for more students to join its team so that it can work with more businesses. </p><p>The year-old Bear Studios is a central resource for students, faculty and staff to get help with their startup businesses, says Avi Felman, director of strategy and one of the group's founders along with Peter Delaney, director of operations and a junior majoring in anthropology-global health and environment with a minor in health-care management. A third founder, Will Papper, transferred from WashU. </p><p>"We are student entrepreneurs, we know how businesses run, we know how to start them and we know what the steps are," says Felman, who two years ago started Venture Focus, a database of venture capital and private equity firms that he sells to startup companies. "Entrepreneurship is something you can teach, and you can show people the path to be on. Obviously the hardest part is actually doing it, but a lot of people don't know what the path is, and we can show them. </p><blockquote>"We've harnessed the great talent pool at WashU and put together a great, cross-disciplinary team that can provide huge benefit to other students at WashU," he says. </blockquote><p>Bear Studios began a year ago, in close collaboration with the Skandalaris Center for Entrepreneurship and the Olin Business School, to assist students who had an idea for a business but needed guidance about how to begin. Over time, the concept has grown to include a fee-for-service consulting firm to meet the needs of those outside of the WashU community or for those in the WashU community with established businesses. </p><p>The team has 14 students from across the university, including students studying computer science, marketing, economics and graphic design, but needs more students who want to help startup businesses. </p><p>"We're growing really rapidly right now, and we have more contracts that we can handle," says Felman, a senior majoring in chemical engineering with a minor in computer science. "We are making a big push to get more Engineering talent as well as graphic design talent." </p><blockquote>Among the services Bear Studios provides are consulting on strategy, marketing plans and step-by-step recommendations for how to get started. In addition, it provides web design and development free for students and for a fee to non-students. Last year, Bear Studios worked with several participants in the university's Bear Cub competition, which awards small grants to help university researchers make the leap from bench scientists to budding entrepreneurs. </blockquote> <p>"We have the same goals as anyone advancing entrepreneurship on this campus because we want WashU to be seen as on par with other top entrepreneurship universities," Felman says. "We want to be that driver." </p><p>Felman says the group's all-student staff has advantages. </p><p>"We found ourselves in the sweet spot in between where we have the resources in experienced members who can help guide students through the difficult process of getting an idea off the ground and being a part of the student population, which helps us tremendously with helping students because they feel comfortable coming to us," Felman says. "It's been an incredible experience to have people come to use with an idea and work with them, then see them pursue it." </p><p>To learn more about Bear Studios, visit <a href="http://bearstudios.org/">BearStudios.org</a> or email Felman at <a href="mailto:avi@bearstudios.org">avi@bearstudios.org</a>. </p><p> </p> <span><hr/></span> <p>​The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 23,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century. </p><div>​​<br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Entrepreneurship at WashU</h3><ul><li> <a href="/our-school/initiatives/Pages/entrepreneurship.aspx">WashU engineers </a>are engaged in St. Louis' startup community and contribute to more than 20 accelerators and incubators.</li><li> <a href="http://fuse.wustl.edu/">WashU Fuse</a> - igniting innovation and connecting entrepreneurs​</li></ul></div>​​​<span style="line-height: 1.6;">​​</span><span style="line-height: 1.6;">​</span></div>​Peter Delaney and Avi FelmanBeth Miller2016-11-04T05:00:00ZStudent entrepreneurs help others to start businesses.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Changing-cell-behavior-could-boost-biofuels-medicine.aspx531Changing cell behavior could boost biofuels, medicine <p>A computer scientist at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a way to coax cells to do natural things under unnatural circumstances, which could be useful for stem cell research, gene therapy and biofuel production.</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/YeastFilamentGreen.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​​​<a href="/Profiles/Pages/Michael-Brent.aspx">​​Michael Brent</a>, the Henry Edwin Sever Professor of Engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, has designed an algorithm, called NetSurgeon, that recommends genes to surgically remove from a cell's genome to force it to perform a normal activity in a different environment or circumstance. For example, ordinary baker's yeast cells normally produce a lot of alcohol, a biofuel, when fed sugar extracted from the edible kernels of corn plants. NetSurgeon designed genetic surgeries that convinced the cells to make more alcohol when fed a type of sugar found in the inedible leaves and stalks. </p><p>The research is published in <em>PNAS Early Edition</em> Oct. 31. </p><div style="float: left; width: 300px; margin: 0px 10px 10px 0px; color: #444444; font-size: 0.9em; font-style: italic; text-align: center;"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Brent_Michael.jpg?RenditionID=6" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/> <br/>Michael Brent</div><p>"Yeast have been engineered to make alcohol out of xylose, a type of sugar found in the woody parts of plants, but they don't do it very well," Brent says. "We think the problem is not that they can't do it, but that they don't want to. So we have to convince them by making them use the same set of genes they use when they're fed sugar from corn kernels. We sometimes think about this as causing the yeast to 'hallucinate' that they are in a sugar they like to turn into alcohol.</p><p>"Ultimately, what we want to impact is the behavior of the cells and the ways they respond to things," Brent says. "One of the ways they respond is by changing the mix of cellular parts they are making. We're trying to engineer the cells to change the mix of parts to do something associated with desirable behaviors, like becoming a liver cell or producing a biofuel. We call this 'transcriptome engineering,' because it changes the control circuits in order to change the production of many parts at once, rather than focusing on one part at a time." </p><p>Brent's research group focuses transcriptional regulatory networks, the control circuits by which cells sense their situation and respond to it by changing how much protein is made from each gene. The key components of these networks are transcription factors, or proteins that turn genes on and off. NetSurgeon takes in the current production level from each gene and the goal level and suggest transcription factors to remove, by deleting the genes that encode them, in order to move production levels toward the goals. </p><p>"If you have a stem cell and want it to be a liver cell, you want to cause it to turn its genes up and down to match the levels found in a liver cell," Brent says. </p><p>While Brent's lab has been studying the way yeast responds to excess sugar, Brent says this technique can be applied to any organism. </p><p>"Many of the same circuits exist in human cells and are even drug targets," he says. </p><p>He has made it available as open source software at <a href="http://mblab.wustl.edu/software.html">mblab.wustl.edu</a>.</p><p> </p> <span> <hr/></span> <p> <a href="http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2016/11/02/1603577113.full">Michael D, Maier E, Brown H, Gish S,​ Fiore C, Brown R, Brent M. Model-based transcriptome engineering promotes a fermentative transcriptional state in yeast. PNAS Early Edition, Oct. 31, 2016. ​</a></p><p>Funding for this research was provided by the National Institutes of Health (GM100452 and T32HG000045). </p><p>​The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 21,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p><p>​​​</p><p><br/></p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>NetSurgeon​</h3><div style="text-align: center;"> NetSurgeon is a novel algorithm for transcriptome engineering -- designing transcription-factor deletions or over-expressions to move cells to a gene expression state that is associated with a desired phenotype.​</div><div style="text-align: center;"><br/></div><div style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://mblab.wustl.edu/software.html">>> Download the Software​</a></div></div></span>Beth Miller 2016-10-31T05:00:00ZA computer scientist at Washington University in St. Louis has developed a way to coax cells to do natural things under unnatural circumstances, which could be useful for stem cell research, gene therapy and biofuel production.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/New-engineering-building-to-be-named-for-schools-former-dean.aspx530New engineering building to be named for school's former dean<p>​Washington University in St. Louis has announced that the next building in its engineering complex will be named in honor of James M. McKelvey Sr., for 27 years the dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science.</p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/160121_naunheim_washu_engineering_bobick_025.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​​​​​​​​​​​​​James M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall, to be located south of Preston M. Green Hall, will house the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and support Washington University’s data science efforts. The new building is made possible by a lead commitment of $15 million from Washington University alumnus and McKelvey’s son, Jim Jr.</p><p>“We are tremendously grateful for the McKelvey family’s deep and lasting contributions to our university,” Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton said. “They have been involved in nearly every way imaginable. With this generous gift, Jim Jr. further enhances his family’s commitment to the university and helps us honor his father’s remarkable legacy at the School of Engineering & Applied Science.”</p><blockquote>​“Washington University has played a pivotal role in my life and in my father’s life,” said McKelvey Jr. “I am excited to be able to recognize my father’s incredible service at the School of Engineering & Applied Science in a way that will continue to impact faculty and students for generations to come.”</blockquote><p>The McKelvey family’s university roots run deep. The former dean grew up in University City. After earning an undergraduate degree in chemical engineering from the University of Missouri-Rolla, he returned to St. Louis, earning his master’s in chemical engineering in 1947, and a doctorate in chemical engineering in 1950, both from Washington University.</p><p>After his doctoral studies, McKelvey Sr. joined DuPont, where he researched polymer processing, becoming a pioneer in the field. In 1954, he joined the faculty of Johns Hopkins University, and, in 1957, he returned to Washington University as an associate professor of chemical engineering. In 1960, he became a full professor, and in 1962, he was named department chair. Two years later, McKelvey became the seventh dean of the university’s engineering school, a position he held from 1964-1991.</p><p>McKelvey Sr.’s vision helped transform the School of Engineering & Applied Science from a regional program to a nationally recognized research institution. During his more than quarter century tenure as dean, he led the school to prominence in engineering research, education and innovation. He launched the Engineers’ Scholarship Program, the Dual Degree Program and the Cooperative Education Program. Under his visionary leadership, three new buildings — Bryan, Lopata and Jolley Halls — were constructed. The school’s endowment grew more than tenfold, from $4 million to nearly $52 million, and research expenditures grew substantially. Although he officially retired in 1996, McKelvey continued teaching in the chemical engineering department through the 2007-2008 academic year.</p><div style="float: right; margin: 0px 0px 10px 10px; width: 475px; font-size: 0.9em; font-style: italic; color: #444444;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/langsdorf-awd-72-103-12-760x475.jpeg?RenditionID=1" alt=""/> <br/> James McKelvey Sr., dean of the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University 1964-1991, visits with the 1972 Langsdorf Scholars. Established by Dean McKelvey, the merit-based fellowship provides full tuition for engineering students who show exceptional academic promise.</div><p>Washington University has honored McKelvey Sr. with the William Greenleaf Eliot Society’s Search Award and with an undergraduate research award established in his name. His contributions have also been recognized throughout the years by the School of Engineering & Applied Science, which has bestowed upon him its Alumni Achievement Award, Distinguished Faculty Award, and Dean’s Award. In 2003, John F. McDonnell and the JSM Charitable Trust established the James M. McKelvey Professorship in his honor.</p><p>Continuing his steadfast commitment to the university, McKelvey Sr. serves on the Planned Giving Committee and is a volunteer for the engineering school’s efforts in <a href="http://together.wustl.edu/Pages/Home.aspx">Leading Together: The Campaign for Washington University</a>.</p><p>McKelvey Jr. is an accomplished engineer, artist and entrepreneur. He earned bachelor’s degrees in computer science and economics from Washington University in 1987, during which time he also authored two computer programming textbooks. Following graduation, he took a job with IBM and a side position as a teaching assistant in glassblowing.</p><blockquote>A serial entrepreneur, McKelvey Jr. is a co-founder of Square Inc. He also co-founded LaunchCode, a non-profit organization that helps companies find skilled workers for the growing number of tech jobs, and provides free coding courses for those seeking a technology career.</blockquote> <p>McKelvey Jr. currently serves as a partner for Cultivation Capital, a venture capital firm he co-founded in 2012 that focuses on investing in technology and life sciences companies. He has also continued to pursue his interest in glassblowing. In 2000, he co-founded Third Degree Glass Factory, one of the most successful glassblowing schools in the world. He is the author of “The Art of Fire: Beginning Glassblowing,” the leading textbook for novice glassblowers.</p><p>He has served Washington University as a member of the Alumni Board of Governors and has returned to campus to speak about entrepreneurship. In 2012, the School of Engineering & Applied Science honored McKelvey Jr. with its Alumni Achievement Award. He resides in Miami with his wife, Anna, and their young son, Jimmy.</p><p>“McKelvey Hall will allow the School of Engineering & Applied Science to further promote research in computing and data sciences, and also expand collaborative opportunities with other schools at Washington University,” said Aaron Bobick, dean and the James M. McKelvey Professor. “As holder of the endowed professorship named in honor of Dean McKelvey, I am excited that a magnificent building dedicated to the future of engineering and computing will bear his name. It will be a lasting reminder of his innovation, and how he always looked for new ways in which engineering can impact both our local community and the world.”</p><p>McKelvey Hall will be home to the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and will include faculty offices, research laboratories and student learning spaces. The new building will be an important part of the transformation of the east end of the Danforth Campus. A celebratory groundbreaking for the east end transformation project will take place in 2017. Construction of McKelvey Hall is expected to be completed in 2020.</p><p>​​​</p> <span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>James M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall</h3><div> <strong></strong></div><div><ul><li>Groundbreaking in 2017​<br/></li><li>Opening in 2020<br/></li><li>James M. McKelvey, Sr.'s <span style="font-size: 1em;">vision helped transform the School of Engineering & Applied Science from a regional program to a nationally recognized research institution.</span><br/></li></ul></div></div></span>​ <div> <br/> </div><div>​<span> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage</h3><div> St. Louis Post-Dispatch: <a href="http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/education/notes-from-campus/square-co-founder-gives-million-to-washu-for-new-building/article_caed2092-5b8a-504c-9bd7-0c876a50db1b.html?utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter&utm_campaign=user-share">"Square co-founder gives $15 million to WashU for new building named after his dad"</a></div><div> <br/> </div><div>St. Louis Business Journal: <a href="http://www.bizjournals.com/stlouis/news/2016/10/28/jim-mckelvey-donates-15-million-to-washington.html?ana=RSS%26s%3Darticle_search&utm_source=dlvr.it&utm_medium=twitter">"Jim McKelvey donates $15 million to Washington University for new building"​</a></div><div> <br/> </div></div></span>​<br/></div>Front row from left: Chancellor Mark S. Wrighton, Judith McKelvey, James McKelvey Sr. Back row: James McKelvey Jr., Anna McKelvey, Robert McKelvey Erika Ebsworth-Goold https://source.wustl.edu/2016/10/new-engineering-building-named-schools-former-dean/2016-10-28T05:00:00ZJames M. McKelvey, Sr. Hall will house the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and support Washington University's data science efforts.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Jain-presents-at-international-conferences.aspx526Jain presents at international conferences<p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Raj-Jain.aspx">​Raj Jain</a>, the Barbara J. and Jerome R. Cox, Jr. Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering & Applied Science, is giving keynote addresses at four conferences in October and November.</p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jain_Raj.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />​They are:<br/><ul rtenodeid="5"><li rtenodeid="6">The seventh annual IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers)  Information Technology, Electronics and Mobile Communication Conference at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Oct. 13-15. The topic is “Multi-Cloud Global Application Delivery for Internet of Things and Smart Cities.”</li><li rtenodeid="8">Midwest Drone Introduction in St. Louis, Oct 14-15. The topic is “Unmanned Systems: Networking Challenges and Issues.”</li><li rtenodeid="10">The second IEEE International Conference on Collaboration and Internet Computing, Nov 1-3 in Pittsburgh. The topic is “Multi-Cloud Global Application Delivery for Internet of Things and Smart Cities.”</li><li rtenodeid="12">The 2016 International Conference on Communication, Image and Signal Processing in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, Nov.18-20. The topic is “Five Trends Leading to Opportunities in Multi-Cloud Global Application Delivery.”</li></ul>Raj Jainsource.wustl.eduhttps://source.wustl.edu/2016/10/jain-presents-international-conferences/2016-10-26T05:00:00ZProfessor Raj Jain is giving keynote addresses at four conferences in October and November.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Building-smarter-safer-infrastructure.aspx509Building smarter, safer infrastructure​N​ew sensing system developed by Washington University engineers set for a test at Michigan's Mackinac Bridge​<br/><br/><div class="div.youtube-wrap"><div class="iframe-container"> <iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/EnMp0OaAJRw"></iframe> </div> ​​</div><p></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Bridge%20night%20photo.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​​​​​​Our nation’s infrastructure includes massive networks of highways, roadways, bridges, ports, railways, energy delivery systems and aviation. Every American is reliant on these networks, yet they need an enormous amount of upkeep. Failure to maintain infrastructure has a wide range of ramifications, from economics to safety concerns.</p><p>A team of engineers from Washington University in St. Louis is turning to cloud computing for a smarter, self-monitoring solution that can better sound the alarm in specific cases of infrastructure failure. The concept will get its first test this week when it is installed Sept. 21 on Michigan’s Mackinac Bridge, the largest suspension bridge in the western hemisphere.</p><p>“Right now, the maintenance of infrastructure has an enormous cost,” said Shantanu Chakrabartty, professor of electrical & systems engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science. “It’s hard to know how to prioritize. So if you have data, you can do condition-based maintenance. Depending on which part of a structure is vulnerable, you can assign manpower according to that.”</p><p>The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded Chakrabartty’s team a 4-year, $1.1 million grant to develop long-term monitoring of our country’s infrastructure. The goal: creating smart civil infrastructure that can self-monitor, enabling it to predict any failures in case of an extreme event such as an earthquake or flood, and also prioritize areas for emergency response.</p><p>Grant collaborators include Nizar Lajnef from Michigan State University, and Gokhan Peckan from the Network of Earthquake Engineering Simulation at the University of Nevada-Reno.</p><p>Using support from the U.S. Department of Transportation, the Federal Highway Administration and the NSF, Chakrabartty’s team at Washington University had previously designed new sensors able to self-generate power from the minuscule movements, such as vibration or strain value, thus eliminating the need for a traditional battery.<br/></p><p>The sensors can potentially be produced at such a low-cost that large numbers of these devices can be embedded into concrete used to construct roads, bridges and buildings. The new NSF grant will fund the construction of a virtual cloud-based structure for the sensors, allowing them to interface with a wireless network so that their information can be accessed quickly and efficiently in case of an emergency such as an earthquake, flood or even terror attack. The new network is expected to support and enhance maintenance efforts already underway.</p><p>“These sensors are going to continuously monitor the health of the structure, and if something goes wrong, then it’s going to report that to the cloud,” Chakrabartty said. “You never lose the data. So if something happens, you can go back and see that a certain part of the structure experienced abnormal levels of strain, and then according to that, you can schedule your emergency response and your maintenance.”</p><p>Washington University engineers are leaders in the field of infrastructure sensing via wireless technology. <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Chenyang-Lu.aspx">Chenyang Lu</a>, professor of computer Science & engineering, has also developed <a href="https://source.wustl.edu/2013/04/engineering-professor-working-to-help-bridges-withstand-natural-disaster/">cyber-physical simulators</a> utilized to monitor the physical dynamics of civil infrastructure.</p><p>As for Chakrabartty’s research, it will soon move out of the lab and into its first-ever practical application. On Wednesday, Sept. 21, his team will help install the first sensors on the Mackinac Bridge, which connects the state’s upper and lower peninsulas. The suspension bridge, the fifth longest in the world, is widely regarded as a transportation icon, and provides a high-profile test site.</p><p>“There is huge potential and benefit for sensors like these on structures beyond the Mackinac Bridge, and we’re excited these prototypes are being tested here,” said Bob Sweeney, executive secretary of the Mackinac Bridge Authority. “We meticulously maintain and inspect the bridge each year, and sensors like these will complement our efforts, giving us even more information on the bridge’s condition to help keep it well-maintained and safe for many years to come.”</p><p>It is hoped that the Mackinac baseline test will allow the system to be further refined, and will eventually lead to widespread implementation.</p><p>“The technology we’ve developed, we can deploy it all over,” said Xuan Silvia Zhang, assistant professor of electrical & systems engineering and a member on Chakrabartty’s team. “We are truly making an impact to make people’s lives safer.”</p><p>Chakrabartty is available for interviews and may be reached at <a href="mailto:shantanu@wustl.edu">shantanu@wustl.edu</a>.<br/><br/></p><p><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Cloud-bridge.jpg" class="ms-rteImage-3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/>​<br/><span style="color: #626464; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-style: italic; line-height: 21.328px;">This diagram demonstrates how the smart sensor system will work when deployed. Once embedded, the sensors can be scanned and their information shared with a cloud-computing network. This allows maintenance and repairs to be better prioritized, allowing workers to address the most critical needs first</span>.​<br/></p><p></p><span><hr/></span>​<span style="line-height: inherit;">The </span><a href="/Pages/home.aspx" style="line-height: inherit; background-color: #ffffff;">School of Engineering & Applied Science</a><span style="line-height: inherit;"> focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 90 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,300 undergraduate students, more than 900 graduate students and more than 23,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</span>​<div>​<br/>  <div><div class="cstm-section"><h3>​Collabo​rators​</h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Shantanu-Chakrabartty.aspx"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Chakrabartty_Shantanu.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a> <br/> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Shantanu-Chakrabartty.aspx"> <strong>Shantanu Chakrabartty</strong></a><br/> </strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">​​​Professor<br/>Electrical & Systems Engineering</span> </div><div> <strong><br/> </strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Xuan-(Silvia)-Zhang.aspx"> <img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Zhang_Silvia_5631.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px; width: 120px; height: 120px;"/></a>​​</strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Xuan-(Silvia)-Zhang.aspx"><strong>Xuan (Silvia) Zhang</strong></a></strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Associate Professor</span></div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Electrical & Systems Engineering</span><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.3;">​​​​</span></div></div>  ​</div><div><br/>  <div>​​​ <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Media Coverage</h3><p> WNMU-FM (public radio Michigan)​: <span style="line-height: inherit; font-size: 1em;"></span><span style="line-height: inherit; font-size: 1em;"><a href="http://wnmufm.org/post/new-type-sensor-monitor-mackinac-bridges-condition#stream/0">New type of sensor to monitor Mackinac Bridge's condition</a>​</span></p></div></div><div></div></div></div>Smart sensors, designed by an engineering team at Washington University, can easily be embedded into infrastructure, allowing bridges, highways and buildings to self-check for damage in case of an earthquake or other emergency.Erika Ebsworth-Gooldhttps://source.wustl.edu/2016/09/building-smarter-safer-infrastructure/2016-09-20T05:00:00ZA new sensing system developed by Washington University engineers is set for a test at Michigan's Mackinac Bridge.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Building-a-better-internet.aspx508Building a better internet<p>​Research taking place at Washington University in St. Louis, recently funded by the National Science Foundation, will further examine a new infrastructure framework for the internet, boosting both online security and functionality.</p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Crowley_Patrick.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​​The team of engineers led by <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Patrick-Crowley.aspx">Patrick Crowley</a>, professor of Computer Science & Engineering at the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University, has received a $499,960 3-year grant to focus on further developing the concept of Named Data Networking (NDN).</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: 'times new roman'; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"></p><p>“The two big issues for most people when they think about the internet is how can it become more trustworthy and if can it really accommodate all the devices that we want to connect to it,” said Crowley. “It’s in that context that NDN emerged as a network architecture idea.”</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: 'times new roman'; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"></p><p>Crowley says complications with the internet’s current framework arose because it's bas​ed on a relative antiquity: the telephone and its model of communication. Two devices are used, a channel is opened between them and communication is shared, without accommodating specific requests. NDN has emerged as the best possible solution to widen the communication model. While the telephone framework addresses the “where” of online addresses and hosts, NDN is further inclusive, handling the “what” that’s specific to the exact content a user expects to be delivered.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: 'times new roman'; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"></p><p>“We had the insight—the aha moment—that led us to conclude that most of the problems that we have with the internet today around trustworthiness, and scalability and efficiency, can be diagnosed directly back to that phone model of communication,” said Crowley.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: 'times new roman'; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"></p><p>Crowley’s team, along with partners at the University of California-Los Angeles, the University of Arizona and the University of Memphis, will use the NSF grant to build upon existing NDN research, making the platform available and accessible to interested researchers and students.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: 'times new roman'; font-size: medium; line-height: normal;"></p><p>“For the past five to six years, what we’ve done in our scientific, scholarly work has shown that building this NDN architecture is general purpose, has very improved security and trust properties, and has dramatically improved efficiency,” said Crowley.<br/></p><span><hr/></span><p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 23,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.​<br/></p><p>​​​​</p><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Can the i​nternet accommodate ​all the devices we want to connect to it?</h3><div> <strong></strong></div><div><div style="text-align: left;"><p></p><p></p><ul><li> <span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.3;">​M</span><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.3;">omen</span><span style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.3;">tum Magazine's Cover Story: </span> <a href="/our-school/leadership/offices/marketing-communications/magazine/Pages/everythings-connected.aspx" style="font-size: 1em; line-height: 1.3; background-color: #ffffff;">Everything's Connected.​</a><br/></li></ul></div></div></div>Patrick CrowleyErika Ebsworth-Goold2016-09-18T05:00:00Z“The two big issues for most people when they think about the internet is how can it become more trustworthy and if can it really accommodate all the devices that we want to connect to it.”