https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Brian-Bies-10-From-computer-science-to-Chinese-literature.aspx742Brian Bies '10: From computer science to Chinese literature<p>​Brian Bies has found a way to combine his Engineering education at Washington University in St. Louis with a career translating Chinese language to English. <br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20engineer%20Brian%20Bies%20(5).jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Bies, who earned a degree in computer science and math from the School of Engineering & Applied Science in 2010, has lived in China for about six years and has held a range of jobs, including teaching, working on a Chinese TV show and translating — all nontraditional careers for an engineer. </p><p>Bies has his own translation business in Nanjing, a city of about 8 million people, and works with clients who need translation of texts in Chinese history and culture, law and industrial machinery. Bies credits his WashU engineering education and good English writing skills for his success. </p><p>"A lot of translators don't have an engineering background," he said. "When you're translating things that require a lot of logic or technical expertise, it can be difficult if you don't have that background already." </p><p>Apart from the technical knowledge he gained at WashU, the study skills were just as important. </p><blockquote>"The more useful thing I learned in undergraduate studies was how to learn effectively," he said. "Part of being a translator is that you have to learn new things all the time. Every time I get a new project, I have to do a lot of background reading and get a foundation about the material before I can start translation. My engineering studies gave me the skills to do that quickly and effectively." </blockquote><p>Bies' interest in China began when doing an internship there the summer before his junior year at WashU. While he didn't know any Chinese at the time, he picked it up quickly and took Chinese language classes when he returned to WashU for his senior year. After he graduated, he moved to China to teach English part-time to kindergarteners for a year and to continue to learn the language. </p><p>After another year of studying the language on his own, Bies entered a master's program in Chinese literature at Nanjing Normal University. </p><p>"I enjoy literature, but it was more of a good way to practice the language full-time," he said. "We had to read a lot, which built up a good cultural foundation. A lot of the things in the classics are things that people still mention today." </p><blockquote>While finishing his degree, Bies also did translation work part-time, which he planned to turn into full-time work after he graduated. However, by a "fortuitous coincidence," he got a job as a course trainer for the Chinese version of the "American Ninja Warrior" TV show. </blockquote><p>"Before the competition, contestants would come ahead of time, and I would show them the ropes and tell them things to watch out for," he said. "I also helped with designing new courses and obstacles for later episodes."<br/></p><p>When the show hosted an international competition, Bies set it up and coordinated the travel for contestants from around the world. </p><p>"The show didn't get picked up for a second season, but it was fun while I was there," he said. <br/></p><p style="text-align: center; font-style: italic; color: #666666; font-size: 0.9em;"> <img src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20engineer%20Brian%20Bies%20(4).jpg" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/> <br/>​Brian Bies <br/> </p><p>In 2016, Bies spent about 10 months in the United States — including time visiting family in St. Louis and Ron Cytron, professor of computer science & engineering and associate department chair — then travelled back to China via several European countries then through Kazakstan and Russia via Trans-Siberian Rail. <br/></p><p>Bies said he is comfortable living in another culture. </p><p>"There are always different ways of doing things, different foods and different leisure activities, but in the end, I'm still working every day and spending time with friends when I have time," he said. </p><p>Recently, Bies has started another challenge. He is spending some time in the Sakha Republic, a federal subject of Russia, learning the Russian language and culture.  <br/></p>Brian Bies worked as a course trainer for the Chinese version of the "American Ninja Warrior" TV show. Beth Miller 2017-10-23T05:00:00ZBrian Bies found a way to combine his Engineering education at Washington University in St. Louis with a career translating Chinese language to English.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-engineers-to-study-best-way-to-maximize-computers-power.aspx730WashU engineers to study best way to maximize computer’s power<p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Ben-Moseley.aspx">​Benjamin Moseley</a>, a computer scientist at Washington University in St. Louis, has received two multi-year grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) totaling $900,000. <br/></p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Moseley_Benjamin.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>In one grant, Moseley, <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Kunal-Agrawal.aspx">Kunal Agrawal</a>, and <a href="/Profiles/Pages/I-Ting-Angelina-Lee.aspx">I-Ting Angelina Lee</a>, all assistant professors of computer science & engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, received a four-year, $650,000 grant to find a way to schedule jobs so that the parallel computing process runs fairly and efficiently. </p><p>When you type a word or phrase into a search engine, the search goes to many processors looking for the answer in an activity called parallel computing. A team of computer engineers at Washington University in St. Louis is seeking the best way to take advantage of parallel computing to maximize its power and potential.</p><p>Parallel computing, which is now the standard in computing, uses at least two processors, or cores, simultaneously to solve a single problem. A desktop computer generally has eight cores, while a data center would have computers with 128 or 256 cores on one chip, said Moseley, the principal investigator. </p><p>"We want to use the processing power and deliver good quality of service," said Moseley, an applied mathematician. "This would result in more results, so users could do more work, and reduced variance of time it takes to receive results." </p><p>For example, if a user opens a word-processing program, the job will be assigned to a core to begin the program. Moseley and his team will study what happens when the same user decides to watch a video while keeping the word-processing program open. </p><p>"How does the computer decide if it processes the word processing program or runs the video, and how does it allocate this processor in such a way that it delivers whatever is important to you: that the video keeps running and the word processor stays open," Moseley said. </p><p>Prior to parallel computing, hitting a search button would go to just one machine and one processor, where it would be processed in the order it was received, or sequentially. </p><p>Moseley said the team will release its code to the public so that it could potentially be adopted into computer systems. </p><p>As part of the funding, Moseley, Agarwal and Lee will teach parallelism to both undergraduate and graduate students and include several students in the research each summer. Moseley also is developing a distributed computer course. </p><p>In addition, Moseley has received a four-year, $250,000 grant from the NSF to develop an algorithmic foundation for using a new kind of memory called high-bandwidth memory (HBM). </p><p>This project stems from work that Moseley did while a consultant for Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, N.M., looking into a new type of memory with a much higher bandwidth than any previous memory and can be used for supercomputers or large-scale processors. </p><p>"Now that we have this high-bandwidth memory, how do we use it and how do we redesign our parallel programs to leverage this memory," Moseley said. "Most of our interesting applications are big and have large memory requirements, and data is only getting bigger."</p><p>Mosely said HBM redefines the classic memory hierarchy and the way computer scientists view memory and teach it to students. </p><p>"The research into high-bandwidth memory (HBM) has the potential for economic, technological and scientific impact because industry has an investment in this technology, and many of the nation's strategic codes are run on HBM machines," Moseley said. </p><p>This project seeks to develop an understanding of how to algorithmically design codes for HBM enhanced architectures. This work will require new algorithms, models and abstractions designed by researchers who study hardware issues, HPC challenges and theoretical modeling and analysis. <br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p>​Benjamin Moseley, a computer scientist at Washington University in St. Louis, has received two multi-year grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) totaling $900,000. Beth Miller 2017-10-08T05:00:00Z​Benjamin Moseley, a computer scientist at Washington University in St. Louis, has received two multi-year grants from the National Science Foundation (NSF) totaling $900,000.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/NSF-awards-professor-299k-for-cloud-computing-research.aspx705NSF awards professor $299k for cloud computing research<p>​The National Science Foundation recently awarded a Washington University in St. Louis professor nearly $300,000 for continued research about cloud-based computing systems.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jain_Raj.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Raj-Jain.aspx">Raj Jain</a>, the Barbara J. & Jerome R. Cox, Jr. Professor of Computer Science at the School of Engineering & Applied Science, was awarded the three-year grant, which will allow his lab to zero in on how to keep cloud-based computing functioning at its best and more resilient. Jain's research will use artificial intelligence (AI) to find architectural faults in cloud systems, including slow downs in service.</p><p>Jain says the research will benefit a number of cloud applications, including telecommunications and real-time applications such as healthcare and smart grid systems.</p><p>"We're keeping track of what the latest trends and concerns are when it comes to the clouds," said Jain. "Using machine learning, we want to be able to determine if something is faulty right away, or predict when something is going to break down to prevent an outage."<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>Raj Jain2017-08-18T05:00:00ZProfessor Raj Jain was awarded the three-year grant, which will allow his lab to zero in on how to keep cloud-based computing functioning at its best and more resilient.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Crowley-earns-NSF-grant-for-collaborative-research.aspx701Crowley earns NSF grant for collaborative research<img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Crowley_Patrick.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Patrick-Crowley.aspx">​Patrick Crowley</a>, professor of computer science and engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, received a three-year, $100,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for a collaborative research project on “SPLICE (secure predictive low-latency information centric edge) for next-generation wireless networks.” He is working with partners from Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Ohio State, Purdue and Texas A&M universities.<br/></p>Patrick Crowley2017-08-02T05:00:00ZPatrick Crowley is working with partners from Illinois Urbana-Champaign, Ohio State, Purdue and Texas A&M universities.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Testing-begins-for-student-created-app-to-aid-Alzheimers-diagnosis.aspx692Testing begins for student-created app to aid Alzheimer’s diagnosis<p>​In the hectic, tightly scheduled day at a memory clinic, doctors set aside blocks of time to meet with new patients suspected of having dementia. But much of that time is taken up gathering information needed to make a diagnosis, leaving little time for doctors to discuss the condition’s life-changing implications with patients and their families.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Memory-v2-760-600x400.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/36_.000">a</a></div><p>​With the aim of streamlining the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, a student-led team has designed an online app to help doctors more quickly evaluate patients. The app is being tested at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.</p><p>“This app is not meant to replace the visit with the physician,” said MD/PhD student Robert Chen, who co-leads the student group known as Memento that designed the app. “It is meant to help physicians have more information about the patient before they are evaluated in person. With additional reliable and clinically relevant information in the hands of physicians beforehand, the hope is that physicians can make a diagnosis more quickly and confidently, and spend the extra time building a treatment plan and answering questions from patients and caregivers in the face of a devastating diagnosis.”</p><p>The app represents a collaboration between students at the Schools of Medicine, Arts & Sciences, and Engineering & Applied Science. It consists of 60 to 100 questions for a patient’s caregiver to answer on an iPad before the patient sees a dementia specialist. Once the questionnaire is complete, the app will generate a report with the information handily organized into categories that fit with the Clinical Dementia Rating Scale (CDR).</p><p>Developed at the School of Medicine, the CDR is the most commonly used tool for diagnosing dementia. It breaks down the patient’s symptoms into six domains – memory, orientation, judgment and problem solving, community affairs, home and hobbies, and personal care – and provides a score for each.</p><p>“Having all the intake information from the patient and family summarized in alignment with the CDR could be really helpful,” said <a href="https://neuro.wustl.edu/about-us/physician-faculty-directory/nupur-ghoshal-md-phd/">Nupur Ghoshal, MD, PhD</a>, an assistant professor of neurology and of psychiatry, and the faculty mentor on the project. “It wouldn’t make the diagnosis for us, but it could feed into the thought processes that we go through as we evaluate each patient.”</p><p>The students have launched a six-month trial of the new app at the School of Medicine’s <a href="http://memoryloss.wustl.edu/">Memory Diagnostic Center</a>. The caregiver of each new patient arriving for a dementia evaluation will be asked to use the app and answer the questions in the waiting room. Then, a doctor will examine the patient and make a diagnosis as usual.</p><p>Without seeing the patient, another doctor in the clinic will review the app’s report and make a diagnosis as well. With feedback from the physicians, the students will apply machine-learning techniques to identify which questions provided helpful information that led to an accurate diagnosis.</p><blockquote> “We will determine which questions were most indicative, which were the least indicative and, at any given point, what’s the next best question to ask,” said Allen Osgood, who co-leads the Memento team and earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in computer science from the School of Engineering & Applied Science in May.</blockquote> <p>The doctors also will note how long it takes them to read and digest the report, so the students can estimate how much time the app saves.</p><p>Building the app required not just an understanding of how Alzheimer’s disease is diagnosed and treated, but programming and design, as well.</p><p>“One of the students, Jenny Liu, really helped make the app appealing and intuitive,” Ghoshal said. “It doesn’t look like your standard questionnaire. We hope that a warmer design will help caregivers feel more comfortable answering these questions.”</p><blockquote>The student group was brought together by <a href="http://slinghealth.org/">Sling Health Network</a>, a student-run biotechnology incubator that provides resources, training and mentorship to teams of students tackling clinical problems by developing innovative solutions. </blockquote><p>Along with Chen and Osgood, the team includes: Jenny Liu, who earned a bachelor’s degree in biology in 2016; Morgan Redding, who earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science with a second major in mathematics in May; and Stolovitz, who earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science with minors in design and physics, also in May.</p><p>If the trial is successful, the team plans to work with the Alzheimer’s Association to launch the app at other St. Louis-area neurology clinics in the future. Last summer, <a href="/news/pages/student-team-wins-10000-for-alzheimers-disease-diagnostic-tool.aspx">the team won $10,000</a> as a finalist for the Student Technology Prize for Primary Healthcare from the Gelfand Family Charitable Trust.</p><p>“Having the chance to build things from the ground up in an environment where there is no clear answer is definitely a testament to the education we’ve received at Washington University,” Osgood said. “Having the ability to go in and work with professionals to learn HIPAA compliance and systems security and all the different things we need to implement this on the user and technical side has been instrumental to the success of the project.”<br/></p><div class="boilerplate" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #3c3d3d; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 19.2px;"><h5 style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #2f3030;">Memento is supported by Sling Health, formerly Idea Labs, which has paid for two interns; the James M. McKelvey Undergraduate Research Scholar program; and the Alzheimer’s Association of St. Louis.</h5></div><div class="bio-wrapper" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #3c3d3d; font-family: "source sans pro", "helvetica neue", helvetica, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 19.2px;"> <strong style="box-sizing: inherit;"><a href="https://medicine.wustl.edu/news/testing-begins-student-created-app-aid-alzheimers-diagnosis/" style="box-sizing: inherit; color: #a51417;">Originally published by the School of Medicine</a></strong></div><p> <br/> </p> <SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><br/>​​​​​ <div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> <div>​​<br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Entrepr​​eneurship at WashU</h3><ul><li> <a href="/our-school/initiatives/Pages/entrepreneurship.aspx">WashU engineers </a>are engaged in St. Louis' startup community and contribute to more than 20 accelerators and incubators.</li><li> <a href="http://fuse.wustl.edu/">WashU Fuse</a> - igniting innovation and connecting entrepreneurs​<br/></li></ul></div>​​​</div> <br/> </div>To streamline diagnoses of Alzheimer’s disease, a student-led team has designed an online app to help doctors more quickly evaluate patients. (Image: Robert Chen) Tamara Bhandari and Beth Millerhttps://source.wustl.edu/2017/07/testing-begins-student-created-app-aid-alzheimers-diagnosis/2017-07-31T05:00:00ZWith the aim of streamlining the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease, a Washington University student-led team has designed an online app to help doctors more quickly evaluate patients. The app is being tested at the School of Medicine.<p>​By speeding detection, app aims to free doctors to discuss treatment, implications with patients<br/></p>

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