https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-programming-team-headed-to-world-competition-.aspx550WashU programming team places at world competition<p>In the recent ICPC World Finals in South Dakota, the WashU team solved five problems, finishing 34th overall <a href="https://icpc.baylor.edu/worldfinals/results">among teams from all over the world.</a><br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/ICPC_Regionals.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><span></span><div><p>Only three other teams from U.S. universities placed better than the WashU team, which tied with teams from University of California, Berkeley; Indian Institute of Technology-Bombay; and ETH Zurich. The team also finished ahead of many larger U.S. and international engineering schools.<br/></p><p>Roch Guérin, chair of the Department of Computer Science & Engineering, praised the team for its accomplishment.<br/></p></div><div><p>“Given the size of many of those places, and therefore the number of students they draw from, this is pretty remarkable,” Guérin said.<br/><br/></p></div><span><hr/></span><p><strong>Previous story: WashU programming team headed to world competition</strong><br rtenodeid="4"/><strong>Dec. 7, 2016</strong><br/></p><p>​Three Washington University in St. Louis undergraduate students will represent the university at the World Finals of the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Finals in South Dakota next May. <br/></p><p>Patrick Chao, Sam Heil and Joey Woodson took second place in a regional programming competition in November against teams from Northwestern University, University of Illinois, University of Chicago, Vanderbilt University and other universities in the Midwest region. The team was one of four WashU teams at the competition in Springfield, Ill.</p><p>Dennis Cosgrove, a professor of the practice in the Department of Computer Science & Engineering and faculty adviser to the teams, said this is the first year in many years that WashU has had a team qualify for the world competition, which will bring in teams from universities worldwide. </p><p>"There are some really great schools in this region, particularly in computer science," Cosgrove said. "While the faculty members expect WashU to do well, to crack the top three is an impressive feat. Joey, Sam and Patrick should be very proud of themselves." </p><p>The competition gives teams 10 programming problems to solve and only one computer on which to solve them. The team made up of Chao, Heil and Woodson completed seven problems, coming out on top with a team from Northwestern. The Northwestern team won the tie breaker based on total time. </p><blockquote>"WashU not only had a team qualify for Worlds, but also demonstrated the best depth in the region with all of our teams performing well," Cosgrove said.</blockquote> <p>Among the other WashU teams, two completed five problems each, and one completed four.</p><p>Heil, a first-year student majoring in math and computer science, said for one of the problems, the team was given a set of incomplete instructions to get to the end goal. The challenge was to get to the end goal by making the smallest number of changes to the instructions. Heil said this problem took about three hours and about six attempts to get the program to work.</p><p>Woodson, who is earning bachelor's and master's degrees in computer science with a minor in economics, has been on the team for five years. He said the competitions provide him with the opportunity to show his programming and problem-solving skills among the community and have given him valuable practice for his interviews with Google, where he will be working after he graduates. </p><p>"Qualifying for the World Finals gives me the opportunity to represent my school in competition one last time before starting a full-time job," Woodson said. "It is an honor to represent WashU in its first trip to the World Finals in eight years, and I hope we can make our school proud with our performance there, just as we did at Regionals."</p><p>Chao, a senior majoring in physics and math, has been on a team each year while at WashU. </p><p>"It's a nice feeling when you have an idea and you see it crystallize and get an answer and see it come together in a relatively short time span that problem-solving allows," he says. "It's great to be able to end my college competitive programming career on a high note."<br/></p> <span><hr/></span> <p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis focuses intellectual efforts through a new convergence paradigm and builds on strengths, particularly as applied to medicine and health, energy and environment, entrepreneurship and security. With 88 tenured/tenure-track and 40 additional full-time faculty, 1,200 undergraduate students, 1,200 graduate students and 21,000 alumni, we are working to leverage our partnerships with academic and industry partners — across disciplines and across the world — to contribute to solving the greatest global challenges of the 21st century.</p>Members of the four teams representing Washington University at the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest with Dennis Cosgrove (front, far right).Beth Miller2017-06-22T05:00:00ZOnly three other teams from U.S. universities placed better than the WashU team at the World Finals of the ACM International Collegiate Programming Contest (ICPC) Finals.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/WashU-researchers-to-test-anesthesiology-control-tower.aspx663WashU researchers to test anesthesiology control tower<p>​Two Washington University researchers are taking the idea of an air traffic control tower to the operating room at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Barnes-Jewish_Hospital_St_Louis.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/News/34_.000">a</a></div><p><a href="https://wuphysicians.wustl.edu/for-patients/find-a-physician/michael-s-avidan">Michael Avidan</a>, MBBCh, the Dr. Seymour and Rose T. Brown Professor of Anesthesiology at Washington University School of Medicine, and <a href="/Profiles/Pages/Yixin-Chen.aspx">Yixin Chen</a>, professor of computer science & engineering in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, will conduct a pilot study of an anesthesiology control tower to monitor patients’ vital signs and other functions during surgery to prevent negative outcomes and medical errors, which lead to about 250,000 deaths in the U.S. each year.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Avidan, professor of anesthesiology and surgery and director of the Department of Anesthesiology’s Institute of Quality Improvement, Research and Informatics, and chief of the Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology division, and Chen received a two-year, $300,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health to apply “big data” and information technology to monitor patient risk factors during surgery in a project called ACTFAST.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><blockquote>With the funding, the team is setting up a matrix of computer screens that will include one screen for each of the 48 operating rooms at Barnes-Jewish Hospital.</blockquote><p>The screens will monitor the patients’ vital signs and organs and color-code them like a stoplight: green is normal, yellow is in danger, and red is urgent. Clinicians monitoring the screens will be able to determine what is wrong with the patient and notify the clinicians in the operating room immediately.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>In the second phase of the project, the team will use advanced machine learning techniques and big data to predict potential negative outcomes in patients under anesthesia, such as kidney or heart failure or waking while under anesthesia. They will take the data to make predictive models then integrate them into the anesthesiology control tower to predict when patients may be on the brink of a potentially dangerous situation.<br/></p> <SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN> <p> <br/> <br/> </p>​ <div>​<br/></div><div> <br/> </div><div> <br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Collaborators</h3><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Yixin-Chen.aspx"><img src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Chen_Yixin.jpg?RenditionID=3" alt="Yixin Chen" style="margin: 5px;"/></a><br/><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Yixin-Chen.aspx"><strong>Yixin Chen</strong></a><br/> </strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Professor<br/>Computer Science & Engineering</span></div><div> <strong> <br/> </strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong><a href="https://wuphysicians.wustl.edu/for-patients/find-a-physician/michael-s-avidan"><img src="/news/PublishingImages/Michael%20S%20Avidan.jpeg?RenditionID=3" alt="" style="margin: 5px;"/></a>​​</strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <strong> <a href="https://wuphysicians.wustl.edu/for-patients/find-a-physician/michael-s-avidan"> <strong>Michael S Avidan, MBBCh</strong></a></strong> </div><div style="text-align: center;"> <span style="font-size: 12px;">Professor<br/>Anesthesiology & Cardiothoracic Surgery </span></div></div>  <br/></div>Barnes-Jewish HospitalBeth Miller2017-06-22T05:00:00ZProfessor Yixin Chen is part of a team conducting a pilot study of an anesthesiology control tower to monitor patients’ vital signs during surgery.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/New-faculty-join-Computer-Science-and-Engineering-2017.aspx661New faculty join WashU Computer Science & Engineering<p>​Sanjoy Baruah, Ayan Chakrabarti, Chien-Ju Ho, Ulugbek Kamilov, Brian Kocoloski and William Yeoh join the School of Engineering & Applied Science in 2017. <br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/Washington%20University%20in%20St.%20Louis%20Brookings%20Hall.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/News/34_.000">a</a></div><h3>Sanjoy Baruah, professor</h3><ul><li>PhD, MS, computer science, University of Texas, Austin<br/></li><li>BTech, computer science and engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India<br/></li></ul><p>Baruah joins CSE from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he has been a professor of computer science since 2005 and a member of the faculty since 1999. Previously, he was assistant professor at the University of Vermont and the New Jersey Institute of Technology and a faculty research associate at the University of Maryland. He begins Sept. 1. </p><p>Baruah’s research is in scheduling theory; real-time and safety-critical system design; computer networks; resource allocation and sharing in distributed computing environments.<br/></p><span><hr/></span><p><span style="color: #666666; font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em;">Ayan Chakrabarti, assistant professor</span></p><p></p><ul><li>PhD, SM, engineering sciences, Harvard University<br/></li><li>B Tech, M Tech, electrical engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras<br/></li></ul><img src="https://cse.wustl.edu/cseatwashu/events/PublishingImages/Pages/colloquia-series/ayanc.jpg?RenditionID=5" alt="Professor Chakrabarti" class="ms-rtePosition-1" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Chakrabarti joins CSE from Toyota Technological Institute in Chicago, where he is a research assistant professor. Previously, he was a postdoctoral fellow at Harvard University. He joins the faculty Sept. 1.<p></p><p>Chakrabarti’s research focuses on computer vision, computational photography and machine learning. Using tools from machine learning, he works to develop efficient and reliable visual inference algorithms, as well as new high-capability cameras and visual sensors. He also is interested in solving the computer vision applications that impact robotics and autonomous vehicles, graphics and virtual reality, and consumer photography.<br/></p><span><hr/></span><h3>Chien-Ju Ho, assistant professor</h3><p></p><ul><li>PhD, computer science, University of California, Los Angeles<br/></li><li>BS, MS, computer science and information engineering, National Taiwan University<br/></li><li>BS, physics, National Taiwan University<br/></li></ul><img src="https://cse.wustl.edu/cseatwashu/events/PublishingImages/Pages/colloquia-series/chienju.jpg?RenditionID=5" alt="Professor Ho" class="ms-rtePosition-1" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Ho joins CSE from Cornell University, where he is a postdoctoral associate in information science. He was a research intern for Microsoft Research and a visiting doctoral student at Harvard University. He received a Google Outstanding Graduate Research Award in computer science from UCLA in 2015. He joins the faculty Aug. 1.<p></p><p>Ho’s research centers on the design and analysis of human-in-the-loop systems, with a focus on acquiring and utilizing human-generated data. The research spans and draws from the fields of machine learning, algorithmic economics, optimization, and online behavioral social science. He plans to explore the behavioral aspects of data science and to develop realistic human behavior models and study how the models influence the design of machine learning algorithms and incentive mechanisms when humans are involved in producing and using data.<br/></p><span><hr/></span><h3>Ulugbek Kamilov, assistant professor</h3><p></p><ul><li>PhD, electrical engineering, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland<br/></li><li>BSc, MSc, communication systems, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne<br/></li></ul><img src="https://cse.wustl.edu/cseatwashu/events/PublishingImages/Pages/colloquia-series/pic.png?RenditionID=5" alt="Professor Kamilov" class="ms-rtePosition-1 ms-rteImage-1" style="margin: 5px;"/>Kamilov joins the ESE and CSE departments from Mitsubishi Electric Research Laboratories in Cambridge, Mass., where he has been a research scientist in computational sensing since 2015. He previously was an intern for Microsoft Corp. in Zurich, Switzerland. He joins the faculty Sept. 1.<p></p><p>Kamilov’s research areas are developing new techniques for computational imaging in biomedical and industrial applications, as well as signal and image processing, tomographic imaging, X-ray tomography, sensing for autonomous vehicles, inverse problems, statistical inference, proximal-gradient algorithms, belief propagation, message passing and alternating direction method of multipliers.<br/></p><span><hr/></span><h3>Brian Kocoloski, assistant professor</h3><p></p><ul><li>PhD, computer science, University of Pittsburgh<br/></li><li>BS, computer science, University of Dayton<br/></li></ul><img src="https://cse.wustl.edu/cseatwashu/events/PublishingImages/Pages/colloquia-series/linkedin-img.jpg?RenditionID=5" alt="Professor Kocoloski" class="ms-rtePosition-1" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Kocoloski joins CSE from the University of Pittsburgh, where he is a graduate student researcher. Previously, he was a co-op engineer for Advanced Micro Devices (AMD) and a research intern at Sandia National Laboratories. He also was application developer at JPMorgan Chase & Co. and a quality assurance analyst at NCR Corp. He begins Jan. 1, 2018.<p></p><p>Kocoloski’s research seeks to make it easier to efficiently use large parallel computers. His work has focused on system software for high performance computing (HPC) systems, where he has designed lightweight operating systems and virtualization mechanisms to support parallel applications. He is interested in addressing scalability challenges in parallel systems.<br/></p><span><hr/></span><p><br/><span style="color: #666666; font-family: "libre baskerville", "times new roman", serif; font-size: 1.25em;">William Yeoh, assistant professor</span><br/></p><ul><li>PhD, MS, computer science, University of Southern California<br/></li><li>BSE, MS, mechanical engineering and applied mechanics, University of Pennsylvania<br/></li></ul><p><img src="https://cse.wustl.edu/cseatwashu/events/PublishingImages/Pages/colloquia-series/wyeohportrait.jpg?RenditionID=5" class="ms-rtePosition-1" alt="" style="margin: 5px 10px;"/>Yeoh joins CSE from New Mexico State University, where he has been an assistant professor of computer science since 2012. He received a CAREER Award from the National Science Foundation in 2016 and was named one of AI’s 10 to Watch by IEEE Intelligent Systems. Previously, he was a research scientist at Singapore Management University and a postdoctoral research associate at the University of Massachusetts. He joins Sept. 1.</p><p>Yeoh’s research focuses on artificial intelligence with an emphasis on developing optimization algorithms for single and multi-agent system. He also develops efficient incremental search algorithms for solving path planning problems in single-agent systems. These algorithms are popular for solving dynamic path-planning problems in robotics and have been adapted for use in the Mars Rovers and autonomous vehicles in the DARPA Urban Challenge.  His goal is to deploy these algorithms in a smart grid and smart home application, as part of the overall goal of a $5 million NSF research center for which he is co-investigator.<br/></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p><p>​<br/></p><div class="cstm-section"><h3>CSE at WashU<br/></h3><div> <strong></strong></div><p style="text-align: center;">Computer scientists & computer engineers at WashU are driving the frontier of computing forward and developing innovative ways to transform society.<br/><br/><a href="https://cse.wustl.edu/Pages/default.aspx">>> cse.wustl.edu</a></p></div><p><br/></p>2017-06-19T05:00:00ZSanjoy Baruah, Ayan Chakrabarti, Chien-Ju Ho, Ulugbek Kamilov, Brian Kocoloski and William Yeoh join the School of Engineering & Applied Science for 2017-18.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Jain-to-receive-prestigious-ACM-SIGCOMM-award.aspx659Jain to receive prestigious ACM SIGCOMM award<p><a href="/Profiles/Pages/Raj-Jain.aspx">​Raj Jain</a>, the Barbara J. & Jerome R. Cox, Jr. Professor of Computer Science in the School of Engineering & Applied Science, has been selected to receive the 2017 Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) SIGCOMM Award, which recognizes lifetime contribution to the field of communication networks.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/Profiles/PublishingImages/Jain_Raj.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>Through the award, ACM is recognizing Jain for his life-long contributions to computer networking including traffic management, congestion control and performance analysis.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>The prestigious award, to be given at the SIGCOMM Technical Conference in August, <a href="http://www.sigcomm.org/awards">has previously recognized influential leaders behind the Internet. </a><br/></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Jain’s research interests include inter-cloud and multi-cloud computing, architecture for the next generation Internet, wireless for unmanned aircraft systems, wireless emergency communications, aeronautical wireless datalink, energy and sustainability, resource management in wireless networks, mobile video modeling, network security, congestion control and traffic management, energy efficient protocols, performance analysis, and modeling and simulation.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Among numerous awards and honors, Jain has 14 patents and has written 16 book chapters, 65+ journal and magazine papers and 110+ conference papers. Google Scholar lists more 21,000 citations to his publications. He is a co-inventor of the DECbit scheme, which has been implemented in various forms in DECnet, OSI, Frame Relay and ATM Networks.<br/></p>​Raj Jain2017-06-18T05:00:00ZThrough the award, Association for Computing Machinery is recognizing ​Raj Jain for his life-long contributions to computer networking including traffic management, congestion control and performance analysis.
https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Infection-fighting-device-wins-2017-Discovery-Competition.aspx639Infection-fighting device wins $25,000 in 2017 Discovery Competition<p>​A medical device built by undergraduate students to prevent infections in patients using catheters has won $25,000 in the <a href="/current-students/outside-classroom/discovery-competition/Pages/default.aspx">2017 Discovery Competition</a>, sponsored by the School of Engineering & Applied Science at Washington University in St. Louis.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20Engineering%20Project%20Starfish%20Startup.jpg?RenditionID=2" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><div id="__publishingReusableFragmentIdSection"><a href="/ReusableContent/News/34_.000">a</a></div><p>The winning team, named Project Starfish, is creating a device that uses short-wavelength ultraviolet light (UVC), which kills bacteria, molds, viruses and other pathogens, to continuously and effectively kill bacteria in urinary catheters. About 75 percent of urinary tract infections acquired in the hospital are associated with the use of a catheter, and up to 25 percent of hospitalized patients in the hospital receive a urinary catheter, according to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Project Starfish has received a provisional patent for its device and has confirmed with FDA consultants that the device will follow a relatively inexpensive regulatory pathway, said Elizabeth Bowman, a team member who received a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering with a minor in commercial entrepreneurship May 19.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>With Bowman, other team members are:</p><p></p><ul><li rtenodeid="2">John Bisognono, a sophomore majoring in computer science with a minor in bioinformatics<br rtenodeid="4"/></li><li rtenodeid="5">Elliot Jaffe, a BS/MS student in electrical engineering with a second major in physics<br rtenodeid="7"/></li><li rtenodeid="8">Caleb Ji, a first-year student majoring in math<br rtenodeid="10"/></li><li rtenodeid="11">Daniel Lane, a doctoral student in biomedical engineering<br rtenodeid="13"/></li><li rtenodeid="14">Jessica Miller, founder and an MD/PhD student at the School of Medicine and in biomedical engineering<br rtenodeid="16"/></li><li rtenodeid="17">Vineet Chauhan and John Henschen, MBA students in the Olin Business School<br rtenodeid="20"/></li><li>Jay Vasileva, a graduating biomedical engineering student from Saint Louis University<br/></li></ul> The team plans to incorporate as a startup this summer.<p></p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>“We’re really glad that we won this competition because we needed to the money to move us forward to the next step,” said Bowman, who plans to continue working on the project in addition to working as a health-care consultant in Silicon Valley.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>The team’s initial funding to build a 3-D prototype and a small circuit board came from Sling Health (formerly IDEA Labs).</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>The School of Engineering & Applied Science launched the Discovery Competition in 2012 to promote new and innovative discoveries to solve challenges or needs. The competition provides engineering undergraduate students the forum to explore their entrepreneurial interests with support from mentors, to use their creativity to develop solutions for real-world problems and to compete for financial resources that could help turn their ideas into businesses. The annual competition is funded by Engineering alumni.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Taking second place, a $2,500 cash prize and $5,000 in legal in-kind services from Polsinelli was the CyberPowered Home LLC team, which developed a device to manage electric energy use in the home and provide smart-home functionality that could save users as much as 25 percent a year on electricity. Team members Will Blanchard, a junior majoring in computer engineering with second majors in financial engineering and economics & strategy, and Allen Nikka, who received a bachelor’s degree in computer engineering and a master of engineering in computer science with a minor in computer science May 19, say the device could pay for itself in two to five years and would benefit both homeowners and electric utility providers. Blanchard and Nikka plan to start a company this summer to continue work on the project.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Taking third place, which includes a $2,500 cash prize and $2,500 in in-kind legal services from Polsinelli, is SomniScan, a low-cost, in-home test for sleep disorders. More than 40 million Americans have a chronic sleep disorder, but up to 80 percent of them are undiagnosed due to the cost and access to overnight, in-hospital sleep studies. The SomniScan sleep-screening system would detect the presence of sleep disorders, particularly sleep apnea, using a smartphone and a $40-$80 purchase. The study would generate a report that a patient could take to his or her physician to follow up for further care.</p><p style="color: #000000; font-family: "times new roman"; font-size: medium;"></p><p>Team members are:<br/></p><p></p><ul><li rtenodeid="23">Kenny Kim, who received a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering with minors in electrical engineering and biology May 19<br rtenodeid="25"/></li><li rtenodeid="26">Christian Shewmake, who received a bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering and a master’s in systems science & engineering with a minor in computer science May 19<br rtenodeid="28"/></li><li>Teja Vallapuri, who received bachelor’s degrees in biomedical engineering and electrical engineering May 19<br/></li></ul> <br/>The team plans to incorporate this summer to continue work on the technology.<br/><p></p><SPAN ID="__publishingReusableFragment"></SPAN><p><br/></p>​​​​​<div><br/></div><div><br/> <div>​​<br/> <div class="cstm-section"><h3>Entrepr​​eneurship at WashU</h3><ul><li> <a href="/our-school/initiatives/Pages/entrepreneurship.aspx">WashU engineers </a>are engaged in St. Louis' startup community and contribute to more than 20 accelerators and incubators.</li><li> <a href="http://fuse.wustl.edu/">WashU Fuse</a> - igniting innovation and connecting entrepreneurs​<br/></li></ul></div>​​​</div><br/></div>Project Starfish is a student startup company developing a biomedical device to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections.Beth Miller2017-05-22T05:00:00ZProject Starfish is a student startup company developing a biomedical device to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

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