https://engineering.wustl.edu/news/Pages/Computer-science-student-broke-Facebook-during-her-internship.aspx824Computer science student 'broke' Facebook during her internship<div class="youtube-wrap"><div class="iframe-container"> <iframe width="854" height="480" frameborder="0" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/abct1_eYNMw"></iframe> <br/></div></div> ​ <p rtenodeid="2"><em>Grace Egbo, who is studying computer science, shares how she “broke Facebook.” (Video: Tom Malkowicz/Washington University) <br/></em></p><p>​<br/></p><p>Grace Egbo, a computer science student at Washington University in St. Louis, learned a lot about Facebook during her first summer there as an intern.<br/></p><img alt="" src="/news/PublishingImages/WashU%20Engineers%20Grace%20Egbo%20Facebook%20Internship.jpg?RenditionID=1" style="BORDER:0px solid;" /><p>​Mark Zuckerberg really does wear gray hoodies. The free cafeteria serves killer nachos. And “move fast and break things” is not just the company motto; it’s a mode of operation.<br/></p><p>“During orientation, they told us to test new ideas and take risks,” said Egbo, now a junior at the School of Engineering & Applied Science. “On the day I broke Facebook, I realized they meant it.”</p><p>To be clear, Egbo didn’t actually break the globe’s largest social networking platform. Facebook’s roughly 2 billion users could still post, like and share. But Egbo’s experiment crashed the company’s employee site for more than an hour.</p><p>“I knew it was bad when my friend in the New York office called and said, ‘Were you the one who broke Facebook?’ And I was like, ‘Oh my goodness! It went national,’” Egbo recalled.</p><p>Fellow employees jumped in to help Egbo, and the site was back up in an hour. Still, Egbo feared her boss would chastise her for her mistake.</p><p>“The exact opposite happened,” Egbo said. “He said, ‘Hey, how are you? Heard you broke Facebook. Did you learn anything?’ I came away understanding it really is OK to break things. It’s OK to fail at things, as long as you don’t settle into that and feel like a failure. What mattered is that you tried something new.”</p><p>That was the summer before Egbo’s junior year. But Facebook has invited her back for another summer, this time in the company’s London offices. Egbo has a particular passion for Android app development but is eager to tackle any challenge Facebook throws her way.</p><p>“I’m excited,” Egbo said. “I love being at a place where I can go for the hard stuff.”<br/></p><p>​<br/><br/></p><div class="cstm-section"><h3>Engineer your way.<br/></h3><ul><li><a href="/Programs/Pages/default.aspx">Academic Programs</a><br/></li><li> <a href="/prospective-students/undergraduate-admissions/Pages/default.aspx">Undergraduate Admissions</a><br/></li></ul></div><br/>Grace EgboDiane Toroian Keaggy https://source.wustl.edu/2018/02/fail-better-grace-egbo/2018-02-28T06:00:00ZFacebook tells its team to “move fast and break things.” Washington University computer science student Grace Egbo did just that, crashing the company’s internal site during her summer internship.<p>Fail Better: Grace Egbo<br/></p>Y

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